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How to Get Tree Sap out of Jeans

It isn't uncommon while frolicking in nature to take a little bit of it home with you. Tree sap is one of the most notorious substances for attacking our clothing and causing an unsightly sticky mess that is worse to deal with than chewed bubble gum. It's nature's version of putting gum on your seat.

Get Tree Sap out of Jeans

Things You Will Need

  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • Soft, clean cloth
  • WD-40
  • Sponge
  • Sunscreen
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hand sanitizer

It isn't uncommon while frolicking in nature to take a little bit of it home with you.  Tree sap is one of the most notorious substances for attacking our clothing and causing an unsightly sticky mess that is worse to deal with than chewed bubble gum.

It's nature's version of putting gum on your seat.  Fortunately, Mother Nature's tricks are no match for some of these simple tricks which can eliminate the stain in no time at all.

  1. Dab the sap with a clean cloth or sponge dipped in isopropyl alcohol and the sap will evaporate before your eyes before laundering.
  2. Spray the area with WD-40 and let it sit for at least a minute. Scrub the area with a sponge or soft, clean cloth and launder as usual.
  3. Wipe sunscreen on the sap if you are camping and laundering the jeans right away isn't an option. This will at least keep you from being sticky. Rinse the area with clean water to get rid of the sunscreen.
  4. Rub mayonnaise into the tree sap and allow it to sit for 2-3 minutes before laundering.
  5. Scrub the area with hand sanitizer using a clean, dry cloth or paper towel. Launder to remove the alcohol smell.
  6. Tip

    Remove the sap before washing the jeans or it may not come out later.

Things You Will Need

  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • Soft, clean cloth
  • WD-40
  • Sponge
  • Sunscreen
  • Mayonnaise
  • Hand sanitizer

Tip

  • Remove the sap before washing the jeans or it may not come out later.

About the Author

Melynda Sorrels spent 10 years in the military working in different capacities of the medical field, including dental assisting, health services administration, decontamination and urgent medical care. Awarded the National Guardsman’s Medal for Lifesaving efforts in 2002, Sorrels was also a nominee for a Red Cross Award and a certified EMT-B for four years.

Photo Credits

  • http://www.peiros.de/fotoblog/images/20060424182713_2005-12-24.jpg
  • http://www.peiros.de/fotoblog/images/20060424182713_2005-12-24.jpg