×
x

How to Remove Blood from Carpet

Bloodstains present a notoriously difficult challenge for even the most stalwart stain remover. Left alone, the iron and protein in blood sets quickly into a nasty stain, so acting as soon as possible after the bloodshed is crucial.

Bloodstains present a challenge for most household cleaners.

Things You Will Need

  • Club soda or plain, cold water
  • Clean rags
  • Measuring cup
  • Measuring spoons
  • Household ammonia
  • Mild dish detergent

Bloodstains present a notoriously difficult challenge for even the most stalwart stain remover.  Left alone, the iron and protein in blood sets quickly into a nasty stain, so acting as soon as possible after the bloodshed is crucial.

Plain water and club soda both help to prevent a serious stain from setting, while diluted dish detergent lifts and lightens the stain.  A few simple steps help to minimize and remove the appearance of bloodstains so your future guests won't ask any awkward questions.

  1. Blot up any excess blood remaining on the carpet. Do not rub the stain.
  2. Pour cold water or club soda on the stain. Allow the water or soda to penetrate the carpet, then press a rag gently to the stain. Repeat this process to lift as much of the stain as possible.
  3. Dilute 1 tbsp. of household ammonia in 1 cup of cold water and saturate the stain with the mixture. Blot up with clean rags and repeat.
  4. Place a small amount of mild dish detergent on your finger and blot onto the stain without rubbing. Rinse the area with cold water and blot up with clean rags to remove any lingering traces of blood.
  5. Tip

    Do not use hot water on a bloodstain; this only assists the stain in setting.

    Warning

    Ammonia fumes are dangerous; please ensure the area is properly ventilated when using ammonia.

Things You Will Need

  • Club soda or plain, cold water
  • Clean rags
  • Measuring cup
  • Measuring spoons
  • Household ammonia
  • Mild dish detergent

Tip

  • Do not use hot water on a bloodstain; this only assists the stain in setting.

Warning

  • Ammonia fumes are dangerous; please ensure the area is properly ventilated when using ammonia.

About the Author

Gwen Wark is a freelance writer working from London, Dublin, and New York. She has been a published writer since 1998 with works appearing in both university and local publications. Her current writing projects include SEO, web copy, print and advertising features. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English with a minor in history from Rutgers University.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images
  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images