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How to Remove Burn Marks on Cultured Marble

Burn marks on cultured or faux marble can be a real pain. Marble is a sensitive stone and is easily damaged. When a cigarette or curling iron leaves a burn mark on your marble, it's not easy to get rid of. The best idea is to keep a ceramic dish handy to set your cigarettes or curling iron on.

Things You Will Need

  • Medium-grit sandpaper
  • Sponge
  • Primer
  • Spray stone finish
  • Polymer resin
  • Small paint roller
  • Painter’s tape
  • Small paint spreader

Burn marks on cultured or faux marble can be a real pain.  Marble is a sensitive stone and is easily damaged.

When a cigarette or curling iron leaves a burn mark on your marble, it's not easy to get rid of.  The best idea is to keep a ceramic dish handy to set your cigarettes or curling iron on.

But there are ways to make marks disappear. 

  1. Clean the marble thoroughly with a dampened sponge.
  2. Sand the marble with medium-grit sandpaper. Buff down into the burned area, but don't sand it even with the rest of the marble. Do not try to sand the entire burn mark away. It only needs to be scuffed or you could cause further damage. Clean the marble again with the dampened sponge.
  3. Tape along the edges of the marble with painter's tape to protect adjacent surfaces.
  4. Apply a coat of primer with a small roller, ensuring that the entire area is covered. Let the primer dry according to the manufacturer's recommendations.
  5. Spray an even coat of spray stone finish on the marble. Fill in the indentation where the burn mark is. Allow the spray stone finish to dry per the manufacturer’s directions.
  6. Pour a few ounces of polymer resin into a disposable cup and then onto the marble. With the paint spreader, catch drips and keep the polymer resin fairly level. Apply a generous layer of resin and allow it to dry according to the manufacturer’s directions.
  7. Wipe once more with the dampened sponge for a damage-free, high-polish shine.

Things You Will Need

  • Medium-grit sandpaper
  • Sponge
  • Primer
  • Spray stone finish
  • Polymer resin
  • Small paint roller
  • Painter’s tape
  • Small paint spreader

About the Author

Marsanne Petty has been a writer and photographer for over ten years, and is currently pursuing the combination in tandem. She attended Madison Community College, receiving a degree in Administration. She has published several articles for magazines, including Jack Magazine, and the local newspaper, the Jasper News. Her latest creation, a pictoral history of Hamilton County, Florida, was published in early 2009 through Arcadia Publishing.

Photo Credits

  • Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images
  • Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images