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How to Remove a Single Handle Kitchen Faucet

Single-handle kitchen faucet assemblies feature a ball faucet design which, as its name suggests, can be identified by the hollow metal or plastic ball within the faucet housing. The ball itself rotates on top of three rubber valve seats.

Ball faucets are commonly used for single-handle kitchen faucet assemblies.

Things You Will Need

  • Hex wrench
  • Masking tape
  • Adjustable pliers
  • Small standard screwdriver

Single-handle kitchen faucet assemblies feature a ball faucet design which, as its name suggests, can be identified by the hollow metal or plastic ball within the faucet housing.  The ball itself rotates on top of three rubber valve seats.

Most problems associated with ball faucets can be traced to these valve seats rather than to the actual ball.  Fortunately, it is fairly straightforward to remove the faucet’s components to make the necessary repairs.

  1. Cut the sink’s water supply by twisting each of the two supply valves below the sink in a clockwise direction.
  2. Lift the faucet handle to access the handle’s retaining screw at the base of the handle. The retaining screw is usually located on the front of the handle’s base when facing the handle.
  3. Loosen the handle’s retaining screw with a hex wrench. Lift upward on the handle until it detaches from the faucet assembly to expose the cone-shaped faucet cap.
  4. Wrap both jaws of a pair of adjustable pliers with masking tape to avoid marring the finish of the faucet cap. Grasp the knurled base of the cap with the pliers and twist the cap in a counterclockwise direction until it detaches from the faucet assembly to expose the circular faucet cam.
  5. Lift the circular faucet cam off of the faucet, followed by the circular cam washer underneath the faucet cam to expose the ball.
  6. Grasp the vertical rod on top of the ball. Pull the ball out of the faucet housing to expose the three valve seats.
  7. Pry each of the three valve seats out of the base of the faucet housing with a small standard screwdriver.

Things You Will Need

  • Hex wrench
  • Masking tape
  • Adjustable pliers
  • Small standard screwdriver

About the Author

John Stevens has been a writer for various websites since 2008. He holds an Associate of Science in administration of justice from Riverside Community College, a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice from California State University, San Bernardino, and a Juris Doctor from Whittier Law School. Stevens is a lawyer and licensed real-estate broker.

Photo Credits

  • kitchen sink image by jedphoto from Fotolia.com
  • kitchen sink image by jedphoto from Fotolia.com