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How Can I Get Tree Sap Out of a Carpet?

Tree sap may seem frustrating to remove. It is sticky when wet, and once it's dry, it is similar to glue. Whether the tree sap is from a live Christmas tree -- or it came in on the dog's fur -- once it gets on your carpet, it will leave a stain.

Sap has a gooey texture.

Things You Will Need

  • Paper towels
  • 3 cloths
  • Knife
  • Dishwashing soap

Tree sap may seem frustrating to remove.  It is sticky when wet, and once it's dry, it is similar to glue.

Whether the tree sap is from a live Christmas tree -- or it came in on the dog's fur -- once it gets on your carpet, it will leave a stain.  Removing the sap can be accomplished with a few household products, and a little time.

  1. Lay a paper towel, saturated in water, over the tree sap on the carpet. Allow the water to moisten the sap; leaving the towel covering the sap, for at least an hour.
  2. Pick up loose pieces of sap that the water loosened. Use a knife to scratch at any big pieces, to break it up enough to pick it out of the carpet.
  3. Dilute one tablespoon of dishwashing soap in two cups of cool water.
  4. Blot the area of carpet that has sap on it, using the soapy-water mixture and a white cloth. You can use as much of the mixture as necessary. The soap and water should not damage the carpet. Blot the area, rather than rub, to avoid pushing the sap farther into the carpet fibers.
  5. Continue blotting with the mixture, until it completely removes the sap.
  6. Saturate a white cloth with water and wipe the area to remove the soapy-water.
  7. Soak up the moisture, out of the carpet, with a dry white cloth.
  8. Tip

    If the soapy-water mixture does not work, try using undiluted rubbing-alcohol. Be careful to test the alcohol on a hidden area, to ensure it will not damage the carpet.

Things You Will Need

  • Paper towels
  • 3 cloths
  • Knife
  • Dishwashing soap

Tip

  • If the soapy-water mixture does not work, try using undiluted rubbing-alcohol. Be careful to test the alcohol on a hidden area, to ensure it will not damage the carpet.

About the Author

Based in Columbus, Ga., Ashley Hay has been covering animal health and wellness since 2004, and arts and entertainment since 2008. She holds a Bachelors of Arts in psychology from the University of Central Florida.

Photo Credits

  • tree sap image by David Smith from Fotolia.com
  • tree sap image by David Smith from Fotolia.com