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How to Read a Snapper Mower Serial Number

Riding mowers, zero-turn, walk-behinds and push mowers comprise the majority of Snappers products. Within each product line exist several different types of mowers categorized by size, engine horsepower, commercial or residential, mulching or discharge, and so on.

Tip

Use a flashlight and magnifying glass to better see the serial number. Make a notation of the serial number and model number so you'll have it on hand next time it is needed.

Warning

Never work on or around a lawn mower when the engine is hot.

Riding mowers, zero-turn, walk-behinds and push mowers comprise the majority of Snappers products.  Within each product line exist several different types of mowers categorized by size, engine horsepower, commercial or residential, mulching or discharge, and so on. Serial numbers can be found in different areas on each different mower.  Knowing the serial number is important when your mower needs new parts or repairs. Referencing your machine by serial number insures that you’ll be ordering the correct parts for your mower’s particular model and make. 

  1. Move your mower into a brightly lit spot.

  2. Scan the mower deck for a white label, approximately 3-by-2 inches, with black writing.

  3. Locate the label and notice a series of numbers. One set of numbers, and possibly letters, is the model number and will begin with either the word “model” or the letters “mod.” The other set of numbers, and possibly letters, is the serial number and will begin with the letters SN.

  4. Search around the engine if the serial number is not located on the mower deck.

  5. Look for an aluminum tag or plate with the same type of black writing and series of characters as would be on the white label. The serial number will begin with the letters SN.

About the Author

Lisa Larsen has been a professional writer for over 18 years. She has written radio advertisement copy, research papers, SEO articles, magazine articles for "BIKE," "USA Today" and "Dirt Rag," newspaper articles for "Florida Today" and short stories published in "Glimmer Train" and "Lullwater Review," among others. She has a master's degree in education and is a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars.