How to Make a Pillow Top Mattress Comfortable for a Bad Back

Maintaining your mattress regularly can make the difference between painful and restful sleep -- particularly for back pain sufferers.
Backaches can result from lack of mattress or bed frame support.Backaches can result from lack of mattress or bed frame support.
Pillow top mattresses provide a layer of cushion that is filled with foam, feather fill or fiber fill. This layer is sewn on top of a regular spring mattress to provide extra support, as the surface that touches your body. A number of factors affect the comfort, support and longevity of the mattress. Those waking up with back soreness after sleeping on a pillow top mattress might consider ways to fix the mattress for better support and sleep.

Step 1

Purchase a bed frame that offers center support to prevent the pillow top mattress from sagging and supplying uneven back support. Bed frames that offer support include platform bed frames with a solid wood slab and metal or wood frames with at least two legs on the center support. Beds with wood slabs should have at least five slats of wood spaced 2 inches or less apart.

Step 2

Rotate the mattress 180 degrees counterclockwise every three months so that the top and bottom of the mattress switch places. This allows for even wear and tear, improving the comfort and extending the life of your pillow top mattress.

Step 3

Cover your pillow top mattress with a mattress topper to gain the desired support and feel. Pads made from latex or memory foam support the contours of the body, relieving pressure on the spine. Latex foam is firmer than memory foam. Toppers filled with down or polyester fill provide a layer of cushion and embrace parts of the body that do not lay flat on the mattress, such as the lower back.

Things You Will Need

  • Supportive bed frame
  • Mattress topper

About the Author

Taylor DiVico is a professional songwriter, content writer, fiction novelist and poet with more than 15 years of experience. DiVico holds a B.A. in philosophy from the University of Rhode Island and an M.S. from Syracuse University.