DIY Three-Bin PVC Laundry Sorter

Laundry can be a daunting task when one person is doing the washing for everyone in a household.

Cutting the Pieces

A laundry sorter helps you to avoid leaving one sock behind.A laundry sorter helps you to avoid leaving one sock behind.
One difficulty is keeping all the laundry organized. Depending on your laundry habits, you may want to separate whites from colored clothing or pull out delicates for a separate wash load. A three-bin sorter can help you keep the laundry organized neatly. Another way to use a three-, four- or five- bin sorter is to separate the clean clothes in the laundry room for each person in the house, allowing them to get their laundry and hang it up or fold it themselves.

Step 1

Cut 12 1-foot long sections of 1-inch PVC pipe using the pipe cutter for the sections on the long side of the laundry sorter. To use the pipe cutter, unscrew the adjustment knob until the pipe fits within the pipe cutter and tighten the cutter up until it is snug but not tight around the pipe. Twist the cutter around the pipe until it moves freely, then tighten the adjustment knob a bit more. Twist the cutter around the pipe until it moves freely again. Repeat until you cut through the pipe.

Step 2

Cut eight 16-inch sections from the 1-inch PVC pipe for the short sides and separators. Cut eight 2-foot-long sections from the PVC pipe for the legs.

Step 3

Assemble all pieces of the three-bin PVC laundry sorter without gluing initially to check for fit. Make any needed adjustments, hang the bags and only then add glue to the pipes.

Assembly

Step 1

Assemble the long sides. Put a 1-foot-long section into the straight portion of a 4-way elbow, directly opposite it put another 1-foot-long section, add another 4-way elbow and another 1-foot-long section. Add a 3-way elbow on either end of the assembled side. Create four of these.

Step 2

Assemble the top and bottom sections. Turn all the elbows on the assembled long sides until they are all oriented in the same direction. Insert a 16-inch section into the 3-way elbows at either end of the assembled long side and into the two center 4-way elbows. Attach a second assembled long side to the free ends of the 16-inch sections. Before sliding the second assembled long side on, ensure that the last, unused sections on both sides are oriented in the same direction so that when you add the legs, they will all be pointing down.

Step 3

Attach the top and bottom sections together. Insert a 24-inch leg section into all eight empty elbow fittings on the top section. Place the bottom section directly under the top section, with the empty elbows pointing up and push a 24-inch leg into each of the empty elbow fittings on the bottom.

Step 4

Stand the PVC laundry sorter frame up and disconnect one of the top 16-inch sections from only one side of the sorter. Slip the handle of your cloth bag over the 16-inch section. Reinsert the 16-inch section into the empty elbow. Disconnect the 16-inch section next to the one you just put the bag handle over and slip the bag's other handle over it before reinserting it into the empty elbow. Continue until you have hung all three bags.

Things You Will Need

  • Measuring tape
  • 1-inch PVC pipes
  • Pipe cutter
  • 8 PVC 3-way elbows, 1-inch
  • 8 PVC 4-way elbows, 1-inch
  • PVC glue
  • 3 large reusable cloth shopping bags

Tips

  • It may not be necessary to glue any of the PVC sections to the elbows, depending on how tightly they fit.
  • If you find it's necessary to glue some of the PVC sections for stability, refrain from gluing the top 16-inch sections so that you can remove and wash the bags when you want.
  • If you leave the top sections unglued, you can use the bags to return the laundry to each person's room when it's cleaned.

About the Author

Writing fanzine-based articles since 1985, Kasandra Rose writes and edits articles for political and health blogs and TrueBloodNet.com and has an extensive technical writing background. She holds a Bachelor of Science in biology and a Bachelor of Arts in anthropology from the University of Michigan, and a Master of Arts in biology from Wayne State University.