How to Hook Up the Common Wire on a Trane Furnace

The common wire on a Trane furnace carries current from the furnace to the thermostat control.
Electrical power for the furnace comes from the main electrical box. At the furnace, power is then distributed to the ignition system, blower motor and the thermostat control transformer. The transformer reduces the line voltage to 24 volts to operate the thermostat. You can identify and hook up the common wire on your Trane furnace with a minimal amount of tools and basic electrical wiring know-how.

Step 1

Turn off the electrical supply to the Trane furnace at the main panel. Switch the designated circuit breaker to the "Off" position.

Step 2

Remove the thermostat cover from its wall mount to access the wiring terminals. Pull the cover straight off from the wall bracket.

Step 3

Locate the terminal marked “24 C.” This is the terminal connection for the 24-volt common wire.

Step 4

Strip half inch of insulation from the blue wire of the thermostat harness, using wire strippers.

Step 5

Connect the blue wire to the "24 C" terminal. Tighten the terminal screw clockwise, using a flat-head screwdriver. Reinstall the thermostat cover if all other work is complete.

Step 6

Remove the electrical access panel from the lower rear of the Trane furnace. Lift the panel up slightly, then pull it out from the bottom.

Step 7

Locate the thermostat control terminal bus. The bus is mounted vertically with four terminals marked "G," "W," "R" and "C." "C" is the designated terminal for the common wire.

Step 8

Strip half inch of insulation from the blue wire from the thermostat, using wire strippers.

Step 9

Connect the blue wire to the "C" terminal. Tighten the terminal screw with the screwdriver. Replace the furnace cover when work is completed.

Things You Will Need

  • Wire strippers
  • Flat-head screwdriver

About the Author

Max Stout began writing in 2000 and started focusing primarily on non-fiction articles in 2008. Now retired, Stout writes technical articles with a focus on home improvement and maintenance. Previously, he has worked in the vocational trades such as automotive, home construction, residential plumbing and electric, and industrial wire and cable. Max also earned a degree of biblical metaphysician from Trinity Seminars Ministry Academy.