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How to Repair a Broken Log Chain

A detachable link makes short work of repairing broken log chains. The link itself is in two parts, like a chain link split in half through its length. One side, called the C-link, is shaped like the letter "C," with one open side where you can drop both the links of the chains to be connected. The other side, called the coupling plate, is crafted so that when it's attached to the C-link, it forms a complete link that's as strong as the original chain.


You can repair a broken log chain with a detachable link.
  1. Look at the coupling plate and C-link of the detachable link to verify that the numbers stamped on both match. The parts for detachable links are not interchangeable.
  2. Remove the broken links from the log chain and hook the end links of the two parts of the chain onto the C-link. Set the C-link on the anvil and place the coupling plate onto the C-link to cover the opening of the "C." The coupling plate only fits on the C-link one way.
  3. Drive the taper pin through the coupling plate and C-link with a ball-peen hammer to secure the plate and C-link together. When the taper pin is level with the surface of the coupling plate, use the punch to drive the pin in until it cannot be driven farther without coming through the side of the C-link.
  4. Insert the lead plug that came with the detachable link into the hole over the top of the large end of the taper pin. Drive the lead plug into the hole until the plug is level with the surface of the coupling plate.

Things You Will Need

  • Detachable link
  • Anvil
  • Ball-peen hammer
  • Punch

Tips

  • If you have to use more than one detachable link, do one at a time. The two halves, the C-link and the coupling plate, come as a unit. You can save time if you don't have to search through four or six parts to find two that match.
  • The detachable link includes everything you need to make the connection: the coupling plate, the C-link , the taper pin and the lead plug.

About the Author

Will Charpentier is a writer who specializes in boating and maritime subjects. A retired ship captain, Charpentier holds a doctorate in applied ocean science and engineering. He is also a certified marine technician and the author of a popular text on writing local history.

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