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How to Hand Paint Soap

Hand paint white bars of soap to enhance your bathroom decor, or wrap them in cellophane and a ribbon to present them as a gift. Soap paint is specifically manufactured to decorate soap and will last through several layers. This paint is usually made with safe non-toxic ingredients. Soap paint is available online and in craft stores. For the best appearance, professional art paintbrushes are recommended. A wide variety of decorative stencils can be found in art supply stores or craft stores to create the design that is right for you.

Soaps of many colors.
White bar of soap.

Place soap on a paper towel and apply cornstarch to the top of the soap. Lightly brush away excess. Cornstarch will help the paint to adhere to the surface of the soap.

Stencils provide shapes.

Place a stencil on the top of the soap. Stencils that are made specifically for decorating soap have the ability to wrap around the bar of soap to keep the stencil stationary.

Paint in a variety of colors.

Dip your paint brush into the paint, and dab the paint onto the stencil. Apply the paint generously to the cutouts of the stencil to ensure complete coverage.

Soap drying on towels.

Remove the stencil, and allow the paint to dry for 15 minutes before applying a second coat, if needed.

An assortment of paintbrushes.

Reapply the stencil, and line up the cut-outs with the painted pattern on the soap, and add a second coat of paint, if needed.

Variety of soaps.

Remove the stencil and allow the paint to dry for 24 hours before wrapping or using the soap.

Things You Will Need

  • Paper towel
  • Cornstarch
  • Paint
  • Paint brushes
  • White soap

Tips

  • Add glitter to paint to create a different look.
  • Dab paint on white paper, and allow the paint to dry to see the exact paint color that will appear on the soap.

Warning

  • Read and follow all manufacturers' warnings and instructions.

About the Author

Liana Christianson is a freelance writer. She has experience with a wide variety of writing styles and subjects. Christianson has worked as an editor and a researcher. She contributes her writing to several different websites.

Photo Credits

  • saponette colorate image by Alfredo Panini from Fotolia.com
  • soap image by romman from Fotolia.com
  • lots of shapes image by timur1970 from Fotolia.com
  • paint play image by Pix by Marti from Fotolia.com
  • towels and soap image by citylights from Fotolia.com
  • paint image by Darren Nickerson from Fotolia.com
  • soap and pumice stone image by Gina Smith from Fotolia.com