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How to Install a Delta Shower Valve

Your Delta shower faucet with a cartridge-type valve is leaking and you want to repair it yourself. This type of shower faucet has an acrylic handle that rotates for hot and cold and pulls out to turn on and pushes in to shut off. If water continues to trickle out of the faucet long after it was shut off, or if the hot water doesn't turn on, the problem is a defective valve cartridge. To install a new Delta shower faucet valve cartridge, the faucet first must be disassembled.

Installing a new Delta shower faucet valve cartridge requires taking the faucet apart.
  1. Shut off the main water supply to the house. Turn the faucet on to bleed the water lines. Close the shower drain and cover it with a cloth or towel to keep from losing parts down the drain.

  2. Remove an acrylic handle, using a small screwdriver to pry off the button, then remove the handle screw. Remove the handle, using an Allen wrench, to remove the screw under the handle. To remove the escutcheons (decorative wall plate), use a screwdriver to remove the screws. Remove the trim sleeve by sliding it forward.

  3. Pry off the O ring on the stem with a small screwdriver and pull the limit stop off. Remove the brass cam or retaining collar (found on older models) by loosening it counterclockwise with an adjustable wrench. Some models have a threaded ring nut instead of a brass cam that you unscrew to remove.

  4. Pry the valve cartridge gently out of the faucet, using a screwdriver. Use a towel to dry off water that will come out when the valve cartridge is removed. Use a wire brush or toothbrush to clean off corrosion.

  5. Insert the replacement valve cartridge. Reverse the steps to assemble the faucet. Turn the water supply on, uncover and open the drain, and test the faucet.

Warning

  • When you remove the old valve cartridge, take note of the orientation of the part. If you put the replacement valve in incorrectly, the hot and cold water will be reversed and you must take the faucet apart to correct the problem.

About the Author

Wendy Adams has been a Web designer, content writer and blogger since 1998. Her love for writing began in high school and continued with a life of personal writing, content writing, blogging, commentary and short articles. Her work appears on Demand Studios, Text Broker, Associated Content and on client websites and numerous social network sites.