How to Remove Grape Soda Stains From Carpet

Carpeting adds to the appearance and comfort of any home.

Grape-flavored soda can leave a dark stain.Grape-flavored soda can leave a dark stain.
The smallest of stains on your carpeting can create an eyesore. Even worse is if the stain on your carpet is a grape soda stain. Purple grape stains are known to be difficult to remove because they are so dark and contain coloring chemicals. Act fast, using supplies in your home, and the grape soda stain will come out. Even if the grape soda stain is old, there's still hope for restoring your carpet to its stain-free appearance again.

Blot up as much of the grape soda stain using absorbent cotton cloths. Continually move the cloth to a clean, dry part and blot until there's no more transfer of stain to cloth.

A spray bottle makes a good applicator.

Pour club soda into a spray bottle and spray it onto the grape soda stain. Wet the stain but do not saturate.

Blot as much of the soda water as possible. Turn the cloth to a clean part, continuing to blot until the cloth no longer wicks up any moisture.

Mix 1 tsp. clear dish washing liquid with 2 cups warm water in a bucket. Apply the soapy solution to the carpet using a clean cloth and allow it to sit for five minutes. Blot the moisture up using a clean, dry cloth.

Combine 1/4 cup of white vinegar and 1 cup of warm water in a bucket. Apply it to any remaining grape soda stain. Allow it to sit for one minute, then rinse with plain water. Blot up all moisture and allow the carpet to air dry completely.

Finish your stain removal job with a vacuum.

Vacuum the carpet to fluff up the fibers.

Things You Will Need

  • Cotton cloths
  • Club soda
  • Spray bottle
  • Bucket
  • Measuring spoons
  • Measuring cups
  • Clear dish washing liquid
  • Water
  • White vinegar
  • Vacuum

Tip

  • Preventative measures are often the best measures. Avoid drinking grape soda anywhere the spill will create a potentially permanent stain.

Warning

  • Blot at the stain, rather than rubbing or scrubbing. The latter will cause the stain to spread.

About the Author

Mary Ylisela is a former teacher with a Bachelor of Arts in elementary education and mathematics. She has been a writer since 1996, specializing in business, fitness and education. Prior to teaching, Ylisela worked as a certified fitness instructor and a small-business owner.