How to Repair an Air Hose

An air hose can crack or puncture for a variety of reasons, and they oftentimes break in very inconvenient spots.

Near the Air Hose Fittings

Learn how to repair an air hose, and you'll avoid spending money on new ones.Learn how to repair an air hose, and you'll avoid spending money on new ones.
The risk of injury or fatality when dealing with compressed air equipment adds to the problem. If you have the right parts and tools for the job, you can make your air hose work as good as new in just a few minutes.

Step 1

Shut off the air supply by disconnecting the air hose or turning the valve to the "off" position.

Step 2

Loosen the air hose fitting clamp with a screwdriver. Gently twist and pull both the fitting and the clamp off of the air hose and set them aside.

Step 3

Cut the air hose about an inch below the break or puncture with a utility knife. Hold the hose down against a hard, flat surface with one hand, and use a sawing motion with your cutting hand. Discard what you cut off.

Step 4

Put the clamp back on to the air hose, followed by the fitting. Push the fitting all the way in and tighten the clamp back down about a half-inch from the end of the hose.

Repairing Breaks Toward the Middle

Step 1

Shut off the air supply by disconnecting the air hose or turning the valve to the "off" position.

Step 2

Use a utility knife to cut the air hose about an inch from both sides of the break or puncture. Hold the hose down on a hard, flat surface and use a sawing motion. Discard the broken air hose piece.

Step 3

Slip a clamp on to each of your air hoses where you just made your cuts.

Step 4

Connect the two air hoses together using an air hose connector piece. Slide both hoses evenly onto the connector, and push them together until they meet in the middle.

Step 5

Move each clamp to about a half-inch from where the two air hoses meet. Tighten them down with a screwdriver.

Things You Will Need

  • Air hose connector
  • Air hose clamps
  • Phillips screwdriver
  • Utility knife
  • Leather gloves

Tip

  • Cut as closely to the break as possible to avoid losing too much air hose length.

Warnings

  • Compressed air systems can be very dangerous. Always take precautions to minimize injury when working with compressed air.
  • Wear leather gloves when using a box cutter in close range of your fingers.

About the Author

Travis Aitch is 24 years old and has been actively writing since the age of 6. As of 2010, Travis has not received any formal education for his talents, however, he has been pursuing a career in freelance writing since 2008, finding success through several different outlets on the Internet, including Demand Studios.