How to Make a Microwave Stand

Microwaves make our lives easier by rapidly heating our leftovers and frozen dinners.

Instead of buying a microwave stand, build your own.Instead of buying a microwave stand, build your own.
Many modern homes have microwaves built right into the kitchen. If you have a free-standing microwave, however, you will have to find a place to put it. If you have run out of counter space and do not want to put the microwave on top your refrigerator, you will need a stand. To save money, make your own stand, which does not require you to learn any special carpentry skills or buy tools.

Purchase your wood from a home improvement store. Ask an employee to cut the wood in the sizes you need. The store should perform this service for free. As an alternative, you can buy the wood, take it home and cut it yourself.

Sand your four posts until they look nice. You do not have to worry about their being perfectly smooth, because they will be beneath your microwave and not seen up close when the stand is finished.

Glue the plywood square to the top of the four posts, with one post in each corner. Allow the glue to dry for at least 24 hours. You can leave the stand upright while it is drying as long as you are careful not to bump into it.

Stain the four posts of your stand and the outer edge and bottom of your plywood square. You do not need to stain the top because it will be covered later. Allow the stain to dry as directed on the package.

Glue the butcher block to the top of the plywood square, making sure that the plywood square is centered beneath the block. Allow the glue to dry for 24 hours before you place anything atop your stand.

Things You Will Need

  • 2-foot by 2-foot butcher block
  • 20-inch by 20-inch plywood, 1-inch thick
  • 4 2-inch by 2-inch wooden posts, 36 inches tall
  • Sandpaper
  • Stain
  • Paint brush
  • Wood glue

Tip

  • These directions are for a large microwave, but you can change the dimensions of the plywood and butcher block if aiming for a smaller size. Make sure that the top of the stand is at least 2 inches larger than the microwave on all sides.

About the Author

Elizabeth Hannigan began writing freelance articles in 2005. Her work can be found in "Orientations" magazine. She holds a Master of Arts in art history from the University of Delaware.