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How to Use a Can Sealer

Buying food in bulk saves money, but it requires an extra step to ensure foods are safe and of good quality. Dry goods that aren't properly stored will ruin before you have a chance to use them. This will negate any savings earned from buying in bulk.


Increase the shelf-life of bulk grains and dry goods by storing them using a can sealer.
  1. Adjust the machine so that it will seal the cans you intend to use. Cans come in a variety of sizes. The adjustment dial on the bottom raises the can pedestal up or down. Some can sealer machines may not have a dial function; instead, they use a raising arm.
  2. Fill the can to within 1/4-inch of the top. Can sealers are typically used for dry goods such as beans, flour, rice and other staple foods. It's possible to seal wet foods -- use the canning guide that came with the machine for instructions to do so.
  3. Place an absorbing packet on top of your dry goods. Most dry goods require the use of an oxygen-absorbing packet to keep them fresh.
  4. Put the lid on the top of the can. Make sure the lid is facing the right way; ridges should be on the top. Place the can on the can pedestal. Press the lower level on your machine to lift the raising disk or can pedestal. Press the lever down and to the left to lock it into position.
  5. Push the sealing handle away from you to begin the sealing operation. Increase pressure on the sealing arm for approximately five seconds. Repeat the action with the sealing handle pulled toward you. This completes the can seam or sealing process.

Things You Will Need

  • Cans
  • Lids
  • Oxygen absorber packets

Tips

  • Store cans in a dry place to prevent rusting.
  • Examine dry-good packages for a sell by date and defects that might allow parasite infiltration.
  • Purchase dry-goods from a reputable dealer if these products are sold from a bin.

Warnings

  • Do not store food in direct sunlight, as it will loose its nutritional value over time.
  • Dry goods that aren't sealed are susceptible to moisture, mold and microscopic parasites.

About the Author

Dakota Wright is a freelance journalist who enjoys sharing her knowledge with online readers. She has written for a variety of niche sites across the Internet including “Info Barrel and Down Home Basics.” Her recent work can be seen in “Backwoods Home Magazine.”

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