How to Freeze Home-Grown Potatoes

Home-grown potatoes straight from the garden provide the fixings for salads, casseroles and fluffy mashed potatoes.

Potatoes are typically stored in a cool, dark area, but can be frozen for some recipes.Potatoes are typically stored in a cool, dark area, but can be frozen for some recipes.
Storing them in a cool, dark area for the winter preserves both their texture and flavor until well into spring. However, if you simply don't have the room or can't provide the conditions they need, freezing them may be an alternative. But freezing does limit their use to either fried or mashed, as fresh potatoes or those cooked in soups or casseroles develop a mushy texture and flavor is compromised.

Prepare you favorite recipe of mashed potatoes. Allow to cool completely and place in a freezer container. Freeze the potatoes immediately. To serve simply defrost and reheat in the microwave. Stir to fluff and allow to set for a few minutes for the best texture and flavor.

Follow your recipe for making twice-baked potatoes and allow them to cool completely. Wrap individual potatoes in aluminum foil and place a single layer in a freezer container. Freeze immediately. To serve, unwrap the potatoes and place them on a baking sheet. Heat in the oven at 350 degrees Fahrenheit until the potatoes are hot.

Pare and cut potatoes into 1/4-inch strips for french fries. Blanch in oil heated to 370 degrees Fahrenheit until the potatoes are soft but have not browned. Remove and place on paper towels to absorb the grease. Cool the potatoes in the refrigerator and seal in plastic freezer bags. Freeze immediately. To serve, deep fry at 390 degrees Fahrenheit until golden.

Grate potatoes for hash browns. Saute in oil until the potatoes are soft but have not browned. Remove from oil and drain. Allow to cool and form into patties with your hands. Freeze in freezer bags. To serve, brown in hot oil.

Things You Will Need

  • Paring knife
  • Mashed potato recipe
  • Twice=baked potato recipe
  • Grater
  • Deep fryer
  • Vegetable oil
  • Freezer containers
  • Aluminum foil

About the Author

Nannette Richford is an avid gardener, teacher and nature enthusiast with more than four years' experience in online writing. Richford holds a Bachelor of Science in secondary education from the University of Maine Orono and certifications in teaching 7-12 English, K-8 General Elementary and Birth to age 5.