How to Remove a Bathroom Vanity Countertop

Replacing the bathroom vanity countertop is a quick way to change the look of your bathroom.
If the countertop is very large, recruit a helper to lift.If the countertop is very large, recruit a helper to lift.
Taking out the old countertop seems complicated, but you can accomplish it with basic household tools. Proceed slowly, as you don’t want to damage the wall or the remaining vanity stand.

Step 1

Turn off the water to the sink, turning the two knobs underneath. These knobs are the shutoff valves that control the hot and cold water supply to the faucet. Turn on both the hot and cold water to empty out the line. You can also turn off the water supply to the building.

Step 2

Place a large bucket under the pipe assembly beneath the sink.

Step 3

Loosen the two nuts that connect the trap — the U-shaped pipe — to the sink and to the pipe leading into the wall. The nuts are at the ends of the trap. Unscrew the nuts and remove the trap; water will spill out into the bucket.

Step 4

Move the bucket against the wall underneath the shutoff valves. Loosen the nuts just above the valve knobs and disconnect the pipes that lead up to the faucet. More water will spill out.

Step 5

Cut through the caulking that connects the sink to the countertop with a utility knife or hammer. Chisel, if the sink is a separate piece. Remove the sink.

Step 6

Cut through the caulking that connects the countertop to the wall.

Step 7

Place the chisel under the countertop and hammer it in between the top and vanity. You can also use a pry bar instead of a hammer and chisel. Remove the countertop. If the countertop is heavy or very large, get an assistant to help you lift it off.

Things You Will Need

  • Bucket
  • Adjustable wrench
  • Cloth (optional)
  • Gloves
  • Utility knife
  • Safety glasses
  • Hammer
  • Chisel or pry bar

Tips

  • Lowe’s recommends having an assistant help you remove the sink and countertop.
  • CornerHardware.com suggests wrapping a cloth around fixtures you want to protect from damage, such as when you must grasp with a wrench.

About the Author

Suzanne S. Wiley is an editor and writer in Southern California. She has been editing since 1989 and began writing in 2009. Wiley received her master's degree from the University of Texas and her work appears on various websites.