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How to Remove Epoxy Paint From Metal

A little care goes a long way, and if you accidentally splashed epoxy paint on your metal garage door when painting the garage floor, you'll understand this as you set about removing the epoxy. To get epoxy paint off metal, you'll need a paint stripper designed for epoxy paint, yet suited to remove paint from metal surfaces. The right product removes the paint quickly and efficiently, so if your stripper isn't working, you have the wrong product.


  1. Read the instructions on the paint stripper before you begin working, since different cleaners have different application instructions, timing and safety requirements. Paint strippers containing methylene chloride work on metal surfaces without degrading the metal; they do contain unhealthy chemicals, but they'll get the job done. Some epoxy removers also take off any type of paint, so you'll need to be careful about exposing adjacent painted areas. Likewise, some cleaners get brushed on while others cannot be brushed on.
  2. Cover over any areas you want to protect with a tarp. Put on a protective face mask, rubber gloves and eye goggles to keep chemicals off your skin.
  3. Paint the epoxy remover on the metal, creating one even layer. Brush in one direction only. If your epoxy paint remover specifies you cannot brush, follow the recommended application guidelines instead. Let the chemical work for the recommended wait time.
  4. Scrape the epoxy paint and paint remover off the metal using a metal or plastic paint scraper. Depending on the saturation of the metal, you may need to apply a second coat to complete the job.

Things You Will Need

  • Paint stripper
  • Plastic tarp
  • Protective face mask, rubber gloves and eye goggles
  • 2-inch-wide paintbrush
  • Metal or plastic paint scraper

Tips

  • Work in a well-ventilated area when using paint strippers.
  • If you need to remove epoxy from a metal ceiling, seek a gel or paste paint remover that will not drip.

Warning

  • Expect these strippers to be caustic chemicals, and plan to take care when working by wearing the gloves, mask and goggles and following the manufacturer's safety instructions. Don't assume you know how it works; take the time to read.

About the Author

A successful website writer since 1998, Elton Dunn has demonstrated experience with technology, information retrieval, usability and user experience, social media, cloud computing, and small business needs. Dunn holds a degree from UCSF and formerly worked as professional chef. Dunn has ghostwritten thousands of blog posts, newsletter articles, website copy, press releases and product descriptions. He specializes in developing informational articles on topics including food, nutrition, fitness, health and pets.