How to Make a Foot Locker

Foot lockers are a great way to store items that don't fit neatly in drawers or are too bulky for them.

The U.S. Army has used foot lockers for storage for many years.The U.S. Army has used foot lockers for storage for many years.
They afford additional storage space while maintaining a neat and orderly appearance to the room. Making a foot locker is a relatively easy task that requires little building experience and few materials.
Make sure you leave one side of the wood unpainted.

Paint one side of each of the pieces of wood your desired color. Lay the wood out to dry, with the unpainted side face down.

Take one 4-foot-by-4-foot piece of wood and lay it so that the unpainted side is face up. Apply wood glue to one of the 2-foot edges of the 4-foot-by-2-foot piece of wood. Place one of the 2-foot-by-2-foot pieces of wood at the edge you just glued, forming a right angle. Make sure the unpainted sides face each other. After the glue has bonded, hammer in four nails, one at each corner, and one six inches from each corner. Repeat this for the other 2-foot-by-2-foot piece of wood on the other side.

Attach two of the remaining larger pieces of wood in the same manner, so that you have a wooden "tub" with all of the unpainted sides facing inward.

wood hinge

Place the two hinges six inches from the corner, on the same side of the open part of the box. Hammer them in, ensuring that they both are facing the same way, which will create the lid for the foot locker.

Set the box on its back, so that the hinges are located on the floor, and nail the remaining piece of wood (the lid) to the hinges. Your foot locker is now complete.

Things You Will Need

  • Four pieces of plywood measuring 4 feet x 2 feet
  • Two pieces of plywood measuring 2 feet x 2 feet
  • Nails
  • Wood Glue
  • Two Hinges
  • Paint

Tip

  • Always ensure edges are flush when nailing.

Warning

  • Any glue you use may be toxic. Make sure your work area is well ventilated.

About the Author

Madeleine Baber has been writing professionally since 2002. She specializes in art, travel, cultural anthropology, language, theater and religion. Baber holds a Bachelor of Arts in religious studies from Millsaps College and a Master of Arts in art history from Richmond University in London.