Cast Iron Decorative Tractor Seat Directions

Cast iron tractor seats are a popular collector's item that has spawned collecting organizations across the country and world.

Joining a tractor seat to a milk can makes an attractive country-style stool.Joining a tractor seat to a milk can makes an attractive country-style stool.
Collectors often travel great distances to acquire favored seat styles and to sell and trade their own seats for others. Interior decorators have picked up on this trend, and images of expensive country homes featuring cast iron tractor seats have become common in country-style magazines. Homeowners who like everything country are now eagerly buying and using these seats in their homes.

Place a cast iron tractor seat over the top of an antique milk can. Center the seat and adjust the fit to the position you like. In the center of the seat is a mounting hole (or several). Note the position of the hole in relation to the top of the can.

Build a bracket to attach the seat to the milk can. Use a piece of metal strap that has holes evenly spaced along the strap. This type of metal band or strap is sold in home improvement stores. Cut 24 inches of strap using a rotary tool or metal cutting shears. Bend the center of the strap to fit along the underside of the seat.

Slide a bolt through the top of the seat into the strap. Tighten a nut to the bolt to hold the strap in place.

Measure the width of the milk can opening. Bend the straps down on each side to fit into the mouth of the milk can. Drill a hole through each side of the milk can. Bolt the milk can to the strap on each side. Tighten the nuts with wrenches.

Spray-paint the seat and can to match your decor. Sand the items first if they are rusted.

Things You Will Need

  • Antique milk can
  • Metal strap
  • Rotary tool
  • Metal shears
  • Pliers
  • Drill
  • Bolt and nuts
  • Wrenches
  • Spray paint
  • Sandpaper

Tip

  • Many farmers painted the lettering on the seats to highlight the location or area where the seat was produced. Since each seat is likely to be different, adding this type of detail can increase the charm of your new stools.

About the Author

F.R.R. Mallory has been published since 1996, writing books, short stories, articles and essays. She has worked as an architect, restored cars, designed clothing, renovated homes and makes crafts. She is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley with bachelor's degrees in psychology and English. Her fiction short story "Black Ice" recently won a National Space Society contest.