Water Is Dripping From the Ice Maker in the Freezer

Water dripping from your freezer or refrigerator is never a good sign.

Unsteady Appliance

Water dripping could mean that a part of your ice maker is failing.Water dripping could mean that a part of your ice maker is failing.
Always check that the unit is on and the power is working, and verify the accuracy of temperature settings with a thermometer. If your refrigerator is still under warranty, contact the manufacturer before you troubleshoot further and give the manufacturer the chance to service the unit.

If your floor isn't level, your refrigerator won't be level unless you take the time to make it so. Keeping the appliance on uneven ground can cause the ice maker to leak. Many refrigerators have adjustable levels that allow you to raise and lower the feet. Consult your user model to find out whether your refrigerator can be adjusted in this manner. If it cannot, insert a small wooden shim under the lowest feet to even the grade and stop drips.

Leaky Parts

A leak in the fill tube that directs water to the ice maker causes dripping in your freezer. Look at the tube inside the freezer leading to the ice maker. If you see water on the tube, or dripping from the tube, you need to replace this tube. A pinch or crimp in the tube can cause a leak, so massage out the pinch to fix the tube. Because the freezer's defroster is often located near the ice maker, a leak in the defrost water drain can make the ice maker appear to be leaking. Examine the plastic piece for cracks, tears or other damage that could cause a leak.

Part Failure

A large leak from the ice maker generally indicates that a major component has failed. Ice makers tend to be inexpensive. If yours has a broken part that's causing dripping water, replacing the ice maker might be more cost-effective than repairing it.

Tips

When troubleshooting your ice maker, turn off the water supply to the ice maker using the shut-off valve under your kitchen sink. This valve is generally attached to the kitchen sink's cold-water valve with copper wire. If you don't see the shut-off valve there, check the basement.

About the Author

A successful website writer since 1998, Elton Dunn has demonstrated experience with technology, information retrieval, usability and user experience, social media, cloud computing, and small business needs. Dunn holds a degree from UCSF and formerly worked as professional chef. Dunn has ghostwritten thousands of blog posts, newsletter articles, website copy, press releases and product descriptions. He specializes in developing informational articles on topics including food, nutrition, fitness, health and pets.