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How to Remove Crayon From Clothes With Borax

It can happen to anybody. You're doing laundry, and you forget to check the pockets. You throw a freshly washed load into the the dryer and when it comes out, every item in the load is streaked with crayon wax. Don't throw the clothes out; they aren't ruined.

It can happen to anybody. You're doing laundry, and you forget to check the pockets. You throw a freshly washed load into the the dryer and when it comes out, every item in the load is streaked with crayon wax. Don't throw the clothes out; they aren't ruined. Reach for borax, a naturally occurring mineral mined from all over the world, including the Death Valley in the U.S. It may take a few cycles, but crayon stains can be removed from fabrics--even whites--with a solution made from borax and a few other household supplies.

Removing the Crayon Marks

  1. Scrape off any excess crayon wax from the stained clothing.

  2. Load the stained clothing into the washer. Add the following ingredients to the load: 2 large scoops liquid laundry detergent, 1 cup white vinegar, 1 cup liquid Shout, 1 cup borax powder and 2 scoops OxyClean powder or a generic brand of OxyClean powder.

  3. Turn on the washer to the heaviest setting. Water temperature doesn't matter.

  4. Inspect your clothing before putting it in the washer. Most or all of the crayon stains should be gone. If any of the stains still linger, run the still soiled items through the wash cycle again with the same mixture, but cut the ratios in half.

  5. Tip

    Borax alone can get most of the stains out on its own, especially for only lightly stained clothing. Borax powder can be found in most grocery stores with the laundry cleaning supplies.

    Warning

    Make sure that there are no traces of bleach in your washer before using this solution. The fumes may be toxic, and the combination will do damage to the clothing.

Warning

  • Make sure that there are no traces of bleach in your washer before using this solution. The fumes may be toxic, and the combination will do damage to the clothing.

About the Author

Antonia Sorin started writing in 2004. She is an independent writer, filmmaker and motion graphics designer based in Raleigh, North Carolina. She has completed work for the Long Leaf Opera Company, the former Exploris Museum and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. She graduated from Thomas Edison State College in New Jersey with a Bachelor of Arts in communications.