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How to Replace an Old House's Intercom System

As households become less reliant on a hard-wired phone system and more dependent on cellular phones, a wireless home intercom system makes sense. If you don’t require landline phones, why integrate your in-home communications with that redundant technology?

Things You Will Need

  • Drill
  • Screwdriver
  • Pencil
  • 9-Volt battery

As households become less reliant on a hard-wired phone system and more dependent on cellular phones, a wireless home intercom system makes sense.  If you don’t require landline phones, why integrate your in-home communications with that redundant technology? A five-channel wireless intercom system can provide communication with five units and one or two doorbell units.

  1. Prepare the first console and antenna. Pull the antenna out from the bottom of the case and point it straight up.
  2. Locate your five consoles. The kitchen is the obvious first location. Children’s bedrooms, a den and the garage could be good locations. Plug the consoles into a nearby power source.
  3. Mount the doorbell units. Insert a fresh battery into the units. Use the mounting plate and pencil to mark the screw locations. Try to keep the units out of direct weather. Attach the mounting plate to the wall with the screws. Tilt the doorbell unit into the mounting plate and secure it with the locking screw underneath. Don’t tighten it yet.
  4. Wall mount or simply place the other consoles on a table. To wall mount the console, route the power supply behind the unit. Use the template that came in the instruction manual and mark the mounting screw locations on the wall. Drive the screws in leaving about 1/4 inch exposed. Mount the consoles on the screws. They just slide on.
  5. Switch the consoles on and test the system. Press the doorbell button and all the consoles should chime. You will need a buddy to help you with this. Respond to the doorbell caller by pressing and holding the Talk button on the console. Adjust the volume on the doorbell as necessary. The adjustment is on the back. When you’ve got it right, tighten up the locking screw.
  6. Test console-to-console calling. Press a console button and then press and hold the Talk button. Wait for the beep and speak. One of the receiving consoles station indicators will light up to show which station called and sound the message. Respond by pressing and holding the Talk button.
  7. Label the station indicator lights and buttons with the location of the consoles.
  8. Remove the old redundant equipment and discard.

Things You Will Need

  • Drill
  • Screwdriver
  • Pencil
  • 9-Volt battery

About the Author

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.