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How to Make Sweeping Compound out of Sawdust

Don't throw away sawdust from your home improvement projects. It can be used to soak up oil spills on the driveway, or it can be the key ingredient in sweeping compound. Sweeping compound can be used to pick up clay or dust and debris. Sawdust can be highly flammable and even combustible at times.

Sawdust is used to make sweeping compound.

Things You Will Need

  • 6 cups of sawdust
  • 2 cups rock salt
  • 1 1/2 cups mineral oil
  • Plastic container with lid

Don't throw away sawdust from your home improvement projects.  It can be used to soak up oil spills on the driveway, or it can be the key ingredient in sweeping compound.

Sweeping compound can be used to pick up clay or dust and debris.  Sawdust can be highly flammable and even combustible at times.

Be sure to keep any sawdust mixture in a closed container, and don't use it near an open flame. 

  1. Place 6 cups of sawdust, 2 cups of rock salt and 1 1/2 cups of mineral oil in a container.
  2. Close the lid firmly and shake to mix.
  3. Sprinkle over clay or dust. The clay or dust will stick to the oily sawdust. Sweep it up or vacuum.
  4. Discard sweeping compound after use by sealing it in a plastic bag or metal container and placing it in the garbage.
  5. Tip

    Use real rock salt rather than snow-melting products. Plain sawdust, without the added mineral oil or rock salt, can be used to soak up oil stains on garage floors or driveways.

    Warning

    Never use sweeping compound to soak up flammable solvents.

    Keep the sweeping compound in a sealed container away from open flame.

Things You Will Need

  • 6 cups of sawdust
  • 2 cups rock salt
  • 1 1/2 cups mineral oil
  • Plastic container with lid

Tips

  • Use real rock salt rather than snow-melting products.
  • Plain sawdust, without the added mineral oil or rock salt, can be used to soak up oil stains on garage floors or driveways.

Warnings

  • Never use sweeping compound to soak up flammable solvents.
  • Keep the sweeping compound in a sealed container away from open flame.

About the Author

Nicole Fotheringham has been a writer since 1997. She was born in South Africa and began as a reporter for the "Natal Mercury" and "Cape Argus" newspapers. Fotheringham has a master's degree in English literature from the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images
  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images