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How to Hang Curtains Over a Baseboard Radiator

A baseboard radiator operates via convection. The vents at the top of the unit take in cold air, while the lower vents expel heated air. In this way, air continually circulates. If the intake or outflow of air is blocked, the baseboard heating system will not work efficiently.

A baseboard heater can become quite hot.

A baseboard radiator operates via convection. The vents at the top of the unit take in cold air, while the lower vents expel heated air. In this way, air continually circulates. If the intake or outflow of air is blocked, the baseboard heating system will not work efficiently. Moreover, the baseboard unit can become quite hot when in use. To prevent fire danger, and for the sake of steady circulation, curtains and furniture should be at a distance of at least 12 inches from the radiator.

  1. Measure a distance of 12 inches above the radiator. Mark the point lightly with a pencil.

  2. Measure the distance from the curtain rod down to the marked point above the baseboard.

  3. Purchase or unearth curtains that are not longer than the measurement you took. If you cannot find curtains of this length, you may need to buy longer curtains and hem them with a machine or by hand.

  4. Slip the curtains over the rod and mount the rod onto the wall above the window as you usually do. This may require slipping the ends of the rod onto wall brackets, settling a straight rod onto a pair of protruding brackets, or sliding an expandable rod to rest snugly at the top of the window well.

  5. Tip

    Buying curtains that do not extend beyond the windowsill is a way to help ensure safety and proper heat circulation.

    Warning

    Hanging curtains too close to a baseboard heater may interfere with the circulation of heated air.

Warning

  • Hanging curtains too close to a baseboard heater may interfere with the circulation of heated air.

About the Author

D. Laverne O'Neal, an Ivy League graduate, published her first article in 1997. A former theater, dance and music critic for such publications as the "Oakland Tribune" and Gannett Newspapers, she started her Web-writing career during the dot-com heyday. O'Neal also translates and edits French and Spanish. Her strongest interests are the performing arts, design, food, health, personal finance and personal growth.