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How to Ventilate a Sunroom

Sunroom ventilation is necessary to keep your sun room cool, airy and peaceful. Most sunrooms come equipped with at least one large window or several window panes. The hotness of the sun beaming into this particular glass room can become unbearable for the average homeowner or renter.

Tip

Place a multitude of plants within the sunroom to absorb some of the heat from the sun rays. This will also allow for more oxygenation within the area and bring about a healthier living space.

Warning

Choosing a store bought ventilation system can cut the heat with your sunroom immediately, however the installation process as well as the actual ventilation unit can be quite costly.

Sunroom ventilation is necessary to keep your sun room cool, airy and peaceful.  Most sunrooms come equipped with at least one large window or several window panes. The hotness of the sun beaming into this particular glass room can become unbearable for the average homeowner or renter.  Learning ways to keep your sunroom ventilated can go a long way in protecting your investment as well as providing hours of enjoyable relaxation.

  1. Decide whether it is best to use a do-it-yourself method to ventilate your sunroom or use a purchased sun room ventilation system.

  2. Set up fan, preferably oscillating, within the sunroom. Since the glass in the sunroom will transmit the suns' rays automatically, it is always a good idea to position the fan in the coolest corner of the room. Performing this measure will allow the fan to blow the cooler air around the room.

  3. Open any windows directly adjacent to the sunroom. The air wafting from this window will travel to the sunroom and circulate within it and produce a sense of coolness.

  4. Remove any unnecessary lights from the sunroom. The heat from the lights can cause the sunroom to heat up and hold hot air.

  5. Install opaque drapes within the sunroom and close them during times when no one is inside the room. With this method, the outside heat will not penetrate through the drapes and make for a hot box when you decide to rest in the room.

About the Author

Khalidah Tunkara is an accomplished freelance writer and journalist based in Atlanta, Ga. Tunkara began her writing career in 1994 and attended Georgia Perimeter College. Her articles have appeared in "The New Trend," "Atlanta Journal-Constitution," eHow.com and Trails Travel. Tunkara is the featured Headline News writer for the Examiner.