How to Build a Treehouse Slide

A tree house can give your children years of enjoyment.
Adding extra features to that tree house can only increases the potential for entertainment. Most stores that sell tree house kits or plans also sell the additional accessories, including swings, rope walls and slides. Installing the slide is tricky, because you must have the proper supports and a space wide enough for the slide. The slide gives children a fast way to exit the tree house.

Step 1

Pick a location on the tree house for the slide. The slide runs from one edge of the tree house to the ground below. You must have a flat and open area available for the slide. Measure the width of the tree house, comparing it the available space on the tree house.

Step 2

Measure the length of the slide. Cut two pieces of rope to the same length as the slide and nail the rope to the tree house. Pull the rope down to the ground, observing the slope of the slide from the tree house. Remove the nails and the rope.

Step 3

Set the tree house slide against the open area of the tree house. The edge of the slide should sit flush with the edge of the tree house. Look for the holes at the top of the slide and mark where those holes meet the wood.

Step 4

Drill a 1-inch hole through the tree house on one of the marks you made. Set the slide back on the tree house, lining up the drilled holes with the holes in the wood.

Step 5

Slide one of the bolts through the slide and onto the tree house. Tighten the bolt until it secures in place. Repeat this step with each of the remaining bolts. The bolts keep the slide securely fastened to the tree house and should come included with the slide.

Step 6

Press down on the bottom of the slide, pushing it slightly into the dirt. Go down the slide once, feeling for any loose bolts or wobbling before you let the kids play on it.

Things You Will Need

  • Measuring tape
  • Rope
  • Scissors
  • Nail
  • Hammer
  • Tree house slide
  • Electric drill
  • Bolts, included

Tip

  • If the slide feels wobbly, tighten each bolt, preventing the slide from coming loose.

About the Author

Jennifer Eblin has been a full-time freelance writer since 2006. Her work has appeared on several websites, including Tool Box Tales and Zonder. Eblin received a master's degree in historic preservation from the Savannah College of Art and Design.