How to Put Skirting Around a House Trailer

You get a lot for your money when you add plywood or lattice skirting to a house trailer.

The biggest change is in the appearance. Skirting gives the trailer a more attractive, finished look. Other benefits include improving your insulation and keeping critters away from your abode. Best yet, it's easy for lay people to tackle this project.

Take measurements. Find the length by measuring around the bottom perimeter of the trailer. Dig a 3-inch-deep rut in the ground along that perimeter, and measure from the bottom of the trailer to the bottom of the rut for the width.

Cut the plywood or lattice to size. Make additional cuts where necessary to fit the panels over and around things such as wheels and water connections.

Paint or varnish the skirting material to protect it from the elements.

Attach a piece of thin scrap wood along the side edge of each piece of lattice or plywood. Let it protrude about 3 inches--you'll attach the adjoining piece of skirting to this protrusion so the two pieces will sit flush in place. The scrap wood provides stability as well as joining the two pieces of skirting side by side.

Start with a cut-out spot, such as a wheel area. Insert the first piece of skirting, place the second piece next to it, and screw that second piece to the wood-scrap protrusion.

Join the corners without the protruding scrap wood. Put the two corner pieces in place, and screw in a 2-by-4 on the inside corner of where they meet.

Pack down the earth at the base of each piece of skirting as you proceed around the perimeter.

Things You Will Need

  • 1/2-inch plywood or lattice
  • Saw with fine-toothed blade (40 to 80 teeth)
  • Screws
  • Scrap wood
  • 2-by-4
  • Paint or varnish

Tip

  • You can also use premade skirting material such as vinyl--or even simulated rock or stone. See Resources.

About the Author

Barbara Dunlap is a freelance writer in Oregon. She was a garden editor at "The San Francisco Chronicle" and she currently specializes in travel and active lifestyle topics like golf and fitness. She received a master's degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia and has been a Knight Foundation Fellow.