How to Replace Wall Studs in a Mobile Home

Mobile home wall studs become damaged or warped over time causing lumps in the wall covering.

If the wall bows out too much, beyond what you can stand, you must replace the wall studs in a safe and effective manner. The amount of time necessary for the replacement of wall studs will depend on the size of the job; however, it is reasonable to expect to spend 1 to 2 hours on this project. Replacing mobile home wall studs is not a difficult task, and with due diligence, the average homeowner can complete the job with limited stress.

Remove any wall covering such as paneling or drywall. If you are removing paneling, use a flat bar to gently work the paneling loose at the joints.

Cut the wall studs in half using the reciprocating saw. Once you have the studs cut, gently work the two halves back and forth to remove them from the wall.

Remove any protruding nails by cutting them with the reciprocating saw. The nails that attached the studs to the top and bottom plates should remain in the wood. It would be impossible to pull them out, unless you remove the entire wall.

Cut the studs to the right length. Measure from the top plate down to the bottom plate. Make sure the top plate isn't sagging; if it is, leave about a 1/4-inch extra on the cut.

Replace the wall stud by tapping the new ones into place. Place the top on its mark and gently tap the bottom over to correct mark. Check and make sure the wall stud is plumb using the hand level. Toenail two wood screws at the top and two at the bottom.

Things You Will Need

  • Circular saw
  • Tape measure
  • Carpenter's square/combination square
  • Reciprocating saw
  • 3-inch wood screws
  • Screw gun
  • Carpenters hand level
  • Flat bar
  • Hammer

Warning

  • Be careful when using power tools. Always wear eye protection.

About the Author

Billy McCarley has been freelancing online since April 2009. He has published poetry for Dead Mule, an online literary publication, and holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University Of Alabama where he is also a first-year graduate student in history.