How to Reface Bathroom Cabinets and Replace Doors

Whether you are remodeling your bathroom or just giving it a face lift, there are several ways to help you save money.

Refacing Cabinets

1980s-style bathroom cabinet1980s-style bathroom cabinet
Refacing bathroom cabinets is more cost-effective than purchasing new ones, and in many cases it does not require any demolition. Replacing the doors can also give an old cabinet a new look.

Remove the cabinet doors and drawers. Remove any hardware.

Scrape off any areas of flaky finish and lightly sand the face and sides of each cabinet. This will slightly rough up the surface.

Use warm, soapy water to clean all surfaces. Let the surfaces dry.

Paint the cabinet with an interior latex primer. Let it dry. Repeat with a second coat.

Apply two coats of cabinet, door and trim enamel, allowing dry time between coats. This paint provides an ultra-smooth, factorylike finish and is extremely durable.

Reinstall all doors, drawers and hardware.

Replacing Doors

Remove cabinet door and hardware.

Purchase a sheet of MDF (medium-density fiberboard) or comparable material to create the new cabinet doors.

Using a table saw, cut the MDF to the same size as the original door.

Prime and paint the new cabinet door.

Install hardware on the new cabinet door and reinstall door on cabinet.

Things You Will Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Putty knife
  • Sandpaper
  • Rags
  • Warm, soapy water
  • Paintbrush
  • Interior latex primer
  • Cabinet, door and trim enamel
  • MDF (medium-density fiberboard)
  • Table saw

Tip

  • Searching on Craigslist will often yield free cabinets and cabinet doors. Changing the cabinet hardware changes the look of the entire cabinet.

Warning

  • Follow all manufacturer's recommendations when using paint.

About the Author

Jon Olson holds a Bachelor of Science in industrial technology education from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He also has a Master of Science in curriculum and instruction, as well as a master's degree in educational administration. Olson teaches industrial technology at the high school level and is in charge of all industrial technology curriculum for his school district.