How to Resurface a Laminate Countertop to Look Like Glass

Resurfacing laminate counters is an inexpensive way to update your kitchen.

You can paint over laminate countertops to create a variety of looks from granite to concrete to glass. While glass countertops are all the rage, the cost of installing real glass can be prohibitive. Using a little paint and some creativity, you can achieve the same results at a fraction of the cost.

Using the coarse sandpaper, remove the existing polymer coating from the surface and sides of the laminate countertop.

Tape off areas that will not be painted, such as around the sink or back splash, and cover the floor with a drop cloth.

Pour the primer into the paint pan. Apply one coat of paint primer using the roller or sponge applicator. Let it dry for 24 hours.

Apply three to four coats of high gloss enamel oil-based paint in the color of your choice over the primer, allowing each coat to dry before the next coat. If you are going to add other colors, or a custom design, allow the last coat to dry completely before applying.

When paint is completely dry, use a paintbrush or straight trowel to apply the non-yellowing polymer over the entire surface. Allow to dry until the surface is a little sticky. Smooth and polish it with the straight trowel. Repeat this step several times, depending on how shiny you want it. Let each coat dry completely.

Using a paintbrush, apply one or two coats of clear sealant to the surface and let dry.

Things You Will Need

  • Coarse sandpaper
  • Paint primer
  • High gloss oil-base paint
  • Non-yellowing polymer coating
  • Clear sealant
  • Smooth paint roller or sponge paint applicator
  • Paint pan
  • Paintbrush
  • Tape
  • Drop cloth
  • Straight trowel

Tips

  • You can use a hair blow dryer to help dry and smooth the polymer faster and smooth out any air bubbles.
  • Leaving or creating air bubbles and nicks will give your faux glass a more natural look and will be filled by the clear sealant.

Warning

  • Be sure there is proper ventilation whenever you are painting or using polymer.

About the Author

Suzanne Smith Dickinson has been a professional writer since 1989. She currently maintains a humorous blog that has garnered national attention. Her articles have appeared in "Community Health Forum" magazine, and many of the Suburban newspapers and special sections in Michigan, Georgia and North Carolina. She attended Georgia State University as an Honors English student.