How to Remove Candle Wax From a Bathtub

Candles sitting around the edges of a bathtub can create a romantic or relaxing setting, and can be the sole source of light for the bathroom if arranged properly.
Wax can spill onto the bathtub if you try to move a candle before it is completely cool or blow it out with too much force. You’ll need to drain the bathtub before removing the candle wax.

Step 1

Place two to three ice cubes inside a small plastic bag. Close the bag just above the ice cubes and secure it with a twist tie or tie a knot in it.

Step 2

Place the ice directly over the wax and hold in place for 60 seconds. The goal is to freeze the wax so it becomes hardened. Use a small rag to hold the ice in place and protect your fingers.

Step 3

Use the back side of a dull butter knife to scrape the wax away. It should come right off. If the wax covers a large surface area, you may need to repeat the process to get it all.

Step 4

Use a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser if the wax left a color stain. Wet the Magic Eraser and rub until the stain is gone. You may need to apply pressure to get it all.

Things You Will Need

  • Ice cubes
  • Small plastic bag
  • Twist tie, optional
  • Small rag
  • Dull butter knife
  • Magic Eraser
  • Putty knife, optional
  • Ruler, optional
  • Hardback book, optional

Tips

  • Allow candles to cool completely before removing them to prevent wax from spilling onto the bathtub.
  • When using a dull butter knife, position yourself so you are scraping away from your body to avoid potential injury.
  • You can substitute a putty knife, ruler or the edge of hardback book for the butter knife. The goal is to use a flat stiff edge to pry the wax off.

Warnings

  • Sometimes an iron is recommended to remove candle wax, but an iron should never be used in the bathtub under any circumstances. If moisture gets into the iron while you are operating it, it can cause electrical shock or death.
  • You also should not use boiling water to pour over the wax because it greatly increases your risk of burns from dropped or splashed water.

About the Author

Misty S. Bledsoe has been writing since 1995. She specializes in writing about religion, technology and solar concepts, and her articles appear on various websites. She holds a Bachelor of Science in information technology from American Intercontinental University.