How to Adjust a Stanley Bostitch Roofing Nailer

In order to properly install roofing shingles with a Stanley Bostitch roofing nailer it may be necessary to adjust the nailer in order to set the proper depth of penetration for the nail heads.

Too deep and they will punch through the shingles, reducing the holding power, and too shallow and the nail heads will not touch the tops of the shingles, allowing movement which can lead to holding failure in high winds.

Disconnect the air hose from the roofing nailer. Grasp the handle of the nailer with one hand and the air hose coupling with the other. While holding the nailer firmly, pull the coupling away from the nailer until it disengages from the air nipple on the nailer.

Locate the Dial-a-Depth adjuster on the front of the nailer. This is a small dial, found on the front of the nailer, with the numbers 1 through 5 on it.

Turn the adjuster to change the depth. The dial has graphic instructions showing which direction leads to deeper setting and which leads to shallower. A setting of one will leave the nail head protruding from the surface while a setting of five will set it the deepest.

Reconnect the air hose. Hold the handle with one hand and with the other hand pull the coupling away from the nailer while pushing the coupling on to the air nipple. Once the coupling is seated firmly around the nipple, release the coupling.

Test the nailer by firing a nail into a shingle. Place a piece of shingle on a scrap of wood similar to the roof decking and fire a nail into it. Check to see if the nail is seated to your satisfaction and if not, readjust the nailer.

Things You Will Need

  • Shingle
  • Scrap wood

Tip

  • You can test the depth by actually firing into your roof decking instead of using a scrap piece of wood.

Warnings

  • Pneumatic nailers demand your respect. Always wear eye and ear protection and do not nail within two inches of your hand.
  • Once you are familiar and comfortable with using the nailer, the adjustment can be made on the fly without disconnecting the nailer. Just make sure that you do not have a finger on the trigger and point the nailer away from you or anyone else that may be present.

About the Author

Vance Holloman is a residential contractor and freelance writer living in Atlanta. Much of his writing centers on the expertise he has gained from two decades in the construction industry. His work has appeared in newspapers, magazines and numerous online sites, including eHow.com and "Auburn Plainsman." Holloman has a Master's degree in business from the University of Maryland.