How to Repair an Outdoor Chair

Fixing an outdoor, or patio chair, can be fairly easy.

Wicker Furniture Repair

Most patio furniture is made from either wicker or webbingMost patio furniture is made from either wicker or webbing
The main questions you must answer before starting this task is what material the chair is made of and what weather conditions are going to potentially further damage the chair. According to a Creative Homeowner article at the move. com website, the bulk of patio furniture is referred to as either wicker or "webbing" furniture. Webbing is the strong, clothlike material often attached in strips to outside furniture.
Wicker material can be repaired.

Grab some glue and a pair of needlenose pliers. Add the glue where the wicker has come apart, using the needlenose pliers to hold and direct the pieces of wicker that need repair.

Loop the wicker ends around other loops of the wicker for support. The glue itself isn't enough to hold the wicker in place.

Tuck the wicker under after you're finished gluing. Cut off the excess ends with scissors.

Webbed Furniture Repair

Webbed furniture shows a classic weaving pattern.

Check to see if you have enough replacement webbing on hand to make the repair. If not, buy some at home improvement, hardware or discount department stores.

Unfasten the old webbing, if neccesary. Cut strips from the desired material at the same length as the old webbing. Double-fold the ends of the strips of the new webbing to strengthen it. With the scissors, cut a hole in the double-flap triangle. Starting at the back of the chair, loop and fasten the webbing using clips, washer and screws to the chair's frame.

If the chair's webbing material is being replaced, stretch a strip of webbing from one end of the chair to another. Fasten the strip with the triangles and start weaving, bringing the strips over and under one another. Check for any slack, as this will make the chair's frame weaker. Use clips to get the strips of material as tight as possible when fastening the webbing.

Test your work by opening and closing the chair as well as sitting in it. If the chair isn't satisfactory, make the necessary adjustments. Webbing may need to be tightened and other strips of webbing may need to be loosened. Allow the clips some flexibility within the chair.

Things You Will Need

  • Wicker:
  • Needlenose pliers
  • Glue (a type that adheres in all weather conditions)
  • Scissors
  • Webbing:
  • Screwdriver
  • Extra webbing material
  • Clips

Tip

  • If the durability of the chair is in question, watch the chair over time. It is easier to replace or repair a section of a chair rather than the entire chair. Talk to a home repair store employee about the best materials to use.

About the Author

Jaclyn Thies has been writing since 2007 and editing since 2008. Her articles have appeared on CBS News' "UWire," PBS' "Washington Week" and several other websites and publications. She was also editor-in-chief of Texas Tech University's undergraduate student magazine and its arts and writing journal. Thies is currently working on her Master of Arts at University of North Texas.