How to Get Rust Off Oven Racks

Ovens, like many other appliances and products, will eventually rust over time.

Over time an oven will rust and need to be cleaned.Over time an oven will rust and need to be cleaned.
With the amount of heat an oven gets, the rusting process is certainly sped up. Rust can occur when there is a chemical reaction between the surfaces of iron and steel, particularly when they become heated or damp. Removing the rust from an oven is a rather easy household chore. This is a task that can be accomplished by any homeowner and can make the inside of any oven look new.

Verify that the oven is turned off and has not been used recently. Remove all of the racks from the oven and place them in a large empty garbage bag. Be careful so no holes are poked in the garbage bag when inserting the oven racks.

Lay the bag flat on the ground in a sunny spot in the yard. Fill up the bag with water using a garden hose. Make sure there is enough water to cover the entire oven rack.

Add enough ammonia to the garbage bag to thoroughly mix with the water. Tie the bag shut by the strings provided on the bag. If there are no strings seal it with masking tape.

Leave the bag in the yard for 24 hours. The sun will hit it and combine with the ammonia to remove any grease and rust from the oven rack. Pull the rack out of the garbage bag and rinse it off with a garden hose. Allow proper time to air-dry.

Combine baking soda with water and put it on a piece of aluminum foil. Rub it onto the oven rack on the rust spots that may remain. Rub until all of the remaining spots have been removed. Dry off thoroughly with a paper towel. Place the oven rack back into the oven upon completion.

Things You Will Need

  • Gloves
  • Garbage bag
  • Paper towels
  • Ammonia
  • Masking tape
  • Water
  • Aluminum foil
  • Garden hose

Tip

  • The sunnier the day the better, as the sun will help heat up the ammonia for the best results.

Warning

  • Verify that the oven is off before removing the racks. This will ensure the racks are not hot when removed, are at room temperature and are ready to be cleaned immediately.

About the Author

Alexander Callos began writing in 2005 for "The Lantern" at The Ohio State University and has written for various websites, including Bleacher Report, Top Ten Real Estate Deals and Columbus Sports. He has published articles for CBS Sports, SI.com and other websites. He graduated in 2007 from The Ohio State University with a bachelor's degree in public affairs journalism.