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How to Break My Vacuum Cleaner

Modern vacuum cleaners are simple machines. They consist of a fan that draws air through a tube, and a filter and container to hold the dirt that has been sucked up. Some more elaborate machines have rotating brushes to help scoop up the dirt from the carpeting, but the concept remains the same no matter the style of machine. Even a simple machine like a vacuum can be broken with some concentrated effort on your part. Keep the basic design of the machine in mind and you can break just about every part of your vacuum with very little effort.


Slack on your vacuum maintenance to break your machine quicker.
  1. Ignore your vacuum cleaner bag when it starts to get full. Bags can be an unneeded expense on your budget. Let the bag get overfull until it splits or starts to fray at the corners. The resulting dust and dirt that leaks out will clog the fan or hoses, decreasing the suction power of your machine and eventually clogging it up until it stops.
  2. Pay no attention when your vacuum starts to lose power and doesn't suck up as much dirt. When suction power goes down, it usually means that there is something caught in a hose or attachment. Don't test your hose by trying to suck up a quarter to make sure the passage is clear, and don't use a straightened hanger to probe into the hose, perhaps removing a large hairball or sock. Let the clog stay, and eventually the motor will burn out.
  3. Do not change your vacuum cleaner belt, especially when you hear a whining noise or you smell burning rubber. Both of these signs are indications that the belt needs to be changed right away. Be frugal again by not buying a belt every time something goes wrong with the old one. Make it last as long as possible. The vacuum motor may have extra stress put on it by this development, causing it to wear out even faster.
  4. Yank the plug from the electrical outlet by pulling on the cord near the vacuum, especially at an angle. This can be a good way to fray wires where they connect to the plug, and you may even bend the plug prongs, possibly breaking them eventually. Don't bend over and pull the plug from the socket by hand as this will only prolong the life of your vacuum.

About the Author

Working in sunny Florida, Anne Baley has been writing professionally since 2009. Her home and lifestyle articles have been seen on Coldwell Banker and Gardening Know How. Baley has published a series of books teaching how to live a frugal life with style and panache.

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