×

How to Cut Metal With a Table Saw

A table saw is a metal saw blade that comes up through the bottom of a tabletop in a cut-out slot. The work piece that you are handling rests on the table top as it travels through the saw during cutting. You can use a table saw for cutting a wide variety of materials, including metals. There are a few requirements and techniques that you will need to know to get the metal cut safely and properly, but they are all simple and easy to do.

Learn how to cut metal with a table saw.

Mark the metal with a clear, visible line so you can easily see where the cut needs to be made. Use an erasable marker so no signs of the mark remain when you finish working.

Fit the saw with a non-ferrous carbide tip blade. This blade will reduce flying chips and will cut smoothly through the metal but you should still put on a protective face mask and gloves.

Spray lubricating oil onto the blade before you start sawing to keep the metal and blade from sticking together. Monitor the blade the entire time you are sawing to see whether more oil is needed to keep the blade wet and without friction.

Set the metal down on the table of the saw and line up the marked line with the blade. Make sure you position the metal so the marked line is perfectly in line with the blade.

Position yourself so you are not directly in front of the blade and start the saw and push the metal into the blade. Use a pusher to ease the metal along the saw without having to get your fingers too close to the blade.

Stop cutting into the metal when you have reached the midpoint of the marked line. Pull the metal back off the blade so you can move it off the table.

Turn the metal around so the opposite end of the marked line is lined up with the blade like you did with the first end. Cut into the line and push the metal along until the two cuts meet in the middle.

Things You Will Need

  • Erasable marker
  • Non-ferrous carbide tip blade
  • Face mask
  • Gloves
  • Lubricating oil

Tip

  • You can use stick paste or wax instead of lubricating oil if you have a product that you particularly like to work with.

Warning

  • Never touch the moving blade while the saw is in use or you will severely injure yourself. Cut the power if you need to access the blade for any reason.

About the Author

Based in New Hope, Pa., Stephanie Abir has been writing business- and health-related articles since 1980. Her work has appeared in “Business Week” magazine and “American Health” magazine. Abir holds a doctorate in American literature from the University of South Carolina.

Photo Credits