How to Make Your Own Slatwall With a Table Saw

Slatwall panels are often installed in stores because they can hold a variety of materials.

From hooks to shelves, anything can be added or subtracted from the slatwall panel with ease. The slats in the panel make it possible for hooks and shelves to slide into place onto the panel. Making your own slatwall panels for your home can increase the ease with which you remodel or restructure areas.

Measure the space where you intend to hang the slatwall panel. Mark where the ends of the panel will be with chalk. Use a level to mark the outline of the panel.

Cut the slatwall panels to size with a table saw to make sure they fit into the desired space for the panel. Before you cut the panel make sure the blade of the table saw is sharp and the blade guard is functioning properly. Start the blade of the table saw before putting it onto the wooden panels and saw on the outside of the marked line.

Locate the wall studs with a stud finder and mark them with chalk. You will need to hang the panel onto the studs to provide a stronger grip.

Nail the first board onto the wall to indicate the location of the panel. If satisfied with the location use a drill to countersink screw holes between the slots in the panel. Attach the first board with 2 inch wood screws and make sure they are aligned with the wall stud.

Align the second board and secure it with screws. Continue this process until the entire portion of the wall has been covered with slatwall panels.

Things You Will Need

  • 2-by-4 boards
  • Nails
  • Screws
  • Tape measure
  • Chalk
  • Hammer
  • Drill
  • Table saw
  • Goggles
  • Dust mask

Tip

  • Always wear goggles and a dust mask when operating a table saw.

About the Author

Sanne Godfrey started writing in 2008 for "The Advocate" at Mt. Hood Community College. She became a copy-editor there and later, the editor-in-chief. Sanne was chosen to be a Snowden intern in the summer of 2010, a prestigious journalism internship for Oregon students. She is currently pursuing a degree at the University of Oregon's School of Journalism.