How To Troubleshoot a Carrier Heat Pump System

Carrier heat pumps can play a role in cooling your summers and warming your winters.

Units such as the Infinity Series heat pumps have two stages and operate with less power compared to other units such as the Base Series. A few simple troubleshooting steps can save you money on repairs and ensure that your unit performs at the highest level. Before your call a repair expert, solve simple issues related to power problems, blown fuses and thermostat settings.

Check the indoor and outdoor disconnect switches and make sure they are in the "ON" position if your pump is not coming on. Check the main electrical panel next to the outdoor disconnect switch and inspect the circuit breaker. Remove the fuse from the electrical panel and inspect it. If it is blown, replace it by inserting a new one into the fuse slot. If you don't have a replacement fuse, purchase one from a hardware, appliance or retail store. To find a new fuse, bring the old one to the store.

Inspect your air filter if your pump is not getting sufficient airflow. Open the interior vents if they are closed and remove any debris around the filter.

Check your thermostat settings. If you want to cool your house, select a temperature setting that is lower than the displayed room temperature. Set the "System/mode" control to either "Cool" or "Auto."

Wait a few minutes if after turning on your heating pump it does not immediately begin to function. Some Carrier heating pumps have a time delay feature built to protect the equipment.

Tip

  • Contact a qualified technician if your unit is not working completely.

Warning

  • Do not attempt to repair your unit if you are not experienced or comfortable doing so. You risk damaging it.

About the Author

Kefa Olang has been writing articles online since April 2009. He has been published in the "Celebration of Young Poets" and has an associate degree in communication and media arts from Dutchess Community College, and a bachelor's degree in broadcasting and mass communication from the State University of New York, Oswego.