How to Cut the Baseboard For a Bullnose Corner

Bullnose corners are an attractive way to create graceful curves in a room.

A miter saw will help you make clean and accurate cuts.A miter saw will help you make clean and accurate cuts.
A bullnose is a rounded edge. Bullnose corners can be difficult to install baseboard around if you are not familiar with the process. Instead of cutting poorly fitting miters at the ends of the baseboard, you can use corner blocks designed to fit around bullnose. The baseboard can be cut at a standard 90-degrees at each end and fit between the ends of the corner blocks for a clean and professional fit.

Position a corner block over each corner in the room. Make sure that the back side is flush against the wall and the bottom edges are flush against the floor.

Hammer two evenly spaced finish nails through each side of the corner blocks and into the wall to secure each one in place. Center a nail set over the head of each nail and tap the top of it with a hammer. Set the nails approximately 1/16-inch below the surface of the corner blocks.

Measure the distance between the ends of the corner blocks on each wall using a tape measure. Lay the baseboard molding out on a work surface. Measure each board and mark it to the measurements in step two using a pencil.

Lay one baseboard front face up on the table of a miter saw. Slide the board along the table until the outside edge of the pencil mark is aligned with the blade of the saw.

Pull the trigger and guide the saw down through the board to cut it to length in a steady motion. Raise the saw back up to the start position and release the blade. Repeat this process for each baseboard.

Things You Will Need

  • Bullnose baseboard corner blocks, 1 for each corner in the room
  • Hammer
  • Finishing nails
  • Nail set
  • Tape measure
  • Baseboard molding, 16-foot lengths
  • Pencil
  • Miter saw

Tip

  • Select a baseboard and corner block profile that will complement each other and the existing woodwork within the room.

Warning

  • Wear eye and ear protection when operating a miter saw.

About the Author

Jonah Morrissey has been writing for print and online publications since 2000. He began his career as a staff reporter/photographer for a weekly newspaper in upstate New York. Morrissey specializes in topics related to home-and-garden projects, green living and small business. He graduated from Saint Michael's College, earning a B.A. in political science with a minor in journalism and mass communications.