×

Problems With a Block and Tackle Window Balance

A block and tackle window balance allows the window sash to easily open and close as well as hold the window in place.

Rope Wear

The block and tackle window balance can have several problems.
Problems with the block and tackle window balance can create multiple window difficulties. These difficulties range from simple repairs to complete window replacement. .

One of the most common problems with a block and tackle window balance is when the rope which runs on the pulley wears. This wear comes over time because most ropes used in the block and tackle window balance are made of nylon. Once a rope on one side of the window begins to wear, the window becomes difficult to open or keep open.

Balance Breaks Off

A balance device is located on either side of the window of the block and tackle window balance. The balance of the device can break off or fall off over time and use. The balance allows the window sash to be opened and closed smoothly as well as keep the window open to the desired height. Once the balance falls off, the window sash cannot be opened or closed easily.

Ropes Jumps Pulley

The block and tackle window balance works on a pulley device which rotates with the ropes threaded through the pulley grooves. These sheaves guide the rope on either side of the block and tackle window balance and keep the rope separated as the window sash travels in an up-and-down motion. The ropes can jump the pulley device or sheaves of the pulley, jamming up one side of the window sash or the rope can tangle, jamming the window sash in place.

Pulley Jams

The pulley on the block and tackle window balance can jam over time. The pulley rotates as the window sash is opened and closed. Once the pulley jams, the window sash will not operate smoothly on one side. The window sash will become hard to open on one side and can become misaligned on the travel guides.

About the Author

Horacio Garcia has been writing since 1979, beginning his career as the spokesperson for Trinity Broadcast Network. Within 10 years Garcia was being called upon to write speeches and scripts for several state and federal congressmen, local broadcast networks and publications such as "Readers Digest." He received his bachelor's degree in public relations from Argosy University.