The Uses for Kitchen Shears

Kitchen shears are a must in every kitchen whether you're a seasoned cook or tend to eat dinner from the microwave oven.

Herbs

Kitchen shearsKitchen shears
They are versatile and have several functions other than coupon clipping. Kitchen shears usually are included in a knife block set but can be found in department stores' home sections as well as in any retailer that sells kitchen supplies.

Kitchen shears are perfect for cutting up herbs to include in salads and sauces, on meat and potatoes and anything else that requires chopped herbs. Cutting herbs with kitchen shears also cuts down on mess because you won't need to get out a sharp knife and a cutting board--just snip the herbs directly into a bowl or dish. Snipping herbs with kitchen shears is more precise and helps you keep the size as small or large as you need.

Meat and Pasta

The next time you need to cut up a whole fryer chicken, reach for the kitchen shears instead of the knife. Kitchen shears were designed to cut through bone and muscle and will make this task much easier. You also can trim fat from any cut of meat and use the kitchen shears to cut up cooked meat into bite-size pieces for children, salads or stews. Kitchen shears also can cut up cooked pasta for children quickly and efficiently so they eat more dinner and make less of a mess.

Open Nuts, Crab Legs and Bottles

Most kitchen shears have a designated area with ridges that will open up bottles. This same application also can be used to crack open nuts. Kitchen shears are sharp enough and durable enough to cut open crab legs and lobster tails. Since shears are dishwasher safe, you don't have to worry about what types of food they touch because the dishwasher will sanitize the kitchen shears in time for their next use.

About the Author

Tonya Goodspeed has written professionally since 2003 and specializes in articles on travel, weddings, invitations and home and garden topics. She also ghostwrites Web and blog content. She earned an English degree with a minor in French from the University of Virginia.