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How to Get Red Juice Stains Out of Carpet

Everything was fine until the lid popped off the sippy cup and now there's a bright red stain in the middle of your living room. Instead of finding a piece of furniture to cover it up, keep in mind that these stains are a lot easier to remove than you might have thought.

Removing a red juice stain from carpet is easier than you may have thought.

Things You Will Need

  • Clean cloth or paper towels
  • White vinegar
  • Dish soap
  • Spray bottle

Everything was fine until the lid popped off the sippy cup and now there's a bright red stain in the middle of your living room.  Instead of finding a piece of furniture to cover it up, keep in mind that these stains are a lot easier to remove than you might have thought. With a little quick thinking and a few things you may already have around the house, red juice stains can be remedied as though they never even happened. 

  1. Blot up as much of the stain as possible with a cloth or paper towels to remove any excess moisture.
  2. Dab the stain with a clean cloth dipped in warm water.
  3. Mix together white vinegar and water in equal parts in a spray bottle and add two tbsp. of liquid dish soap.
  4. Spray the solution onto the area and allow it to soak for 10 to 15 minutes.
  5. Dab a clean cloth dipped in clear water to rinse the area.
  6. Place a fan nearby to help the carpet dry quicker.
  7. Vacuum the area once it is completely dry to fluff the pile back up.
  8. Warning

    Test this method on an inconspicuous area of the carpet for colorfastness before using it to treat the stain.

Things You Will Need

  • Clean cloth or paper towels
  • White vinegar
  • Dish soap
  • Spray bottle

Warning

  • Test this method on an inconspicuous area of the carpet for colorfastness before using it to treat the stain.

About the Author

Melynda Sorrels spent 10 years in the military working in different capacities of the medical field, including dental assisting, health services administration, decontamination and urgent medical care. Awarded the National Guardsman’s Medal for Lifesaving efforts in 2002, Sorrels was also a nominee for a Red Cross Award and a certified EMT-B for four years.

Photo Credits

  • Doodledoo: Commons.wikimedia.org
  • Doodledoo: Commons.wikimedia.org