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How to Clean Bacon Grease off a Kitchen Backsplash

A backsplash helps make cleaning the kitchen easier, especially behind the stove where food and grease frequently splatter the walls. A backsplash is typically made from tiles, and cleaning them is usually a cinch; however, bacon grease takes a little bit more effort to remove completely.

Grease tends to splatter when frying bacon.

Things You Will Need

  • Paper towels
  • Large bowl, dishpan or small bucket
  • Grease-cutting dish soap
  • Rag or sponge
  • Grease-cutting household cleaner
  • Nylon kitchen sponge or scrub brush

A backsplash helps make cleaning the kitchen easier, especially behind the stove where food and grease frequently splatter the walls.  A backsplash is typically made from tiles, and cleaning them is usually a cinch; however, bacon grease takes a little bit more effort to remove completely.

With a couple good cleaning methods, though, it should readily come off. 

  1. Wipe as much of the bacon grease off as you can with paper towels. Discard.
  2. Fill a large bowl, dishpan or small bucket with hot water. Add 1 tsp. of grease-cutting dish soap. Dip a clean rag or sponge in the soapy water and wring it out so the water is not dripping.
  3. Clean the backsplash with the soapy rag or sponge, rinsing it out in the soapy water as needed. Go over the backsplash two to three times to effectively remove the bacon grease.
  4. Spray the backsplash lightly with a grease-cutting household cleaner to remove any remaining grease. Let the cleaner soak in for 20 minutes, respraying as necessary to keep the tiles moist. Use the rag or sponge to wipe down the surface. For hard-to-remove bacon grease or to get between the tiles, clean the backsplash with the rough side of a nylon kitchen sponge or a nylon scrub brush.
  5. Wring out the rag or sponge in clean hot water and wipe down the backsplash two to three times to rinse all the cleaner and grease residues away.

Things You Will Need

  • Paper towels
  • Large bowl, dishpan or small bucket
  • Grease-cutting dish soap
  • Rag or sponge
  • Grease-cutting household cleaner
  • Nylon kitchen sponge or scrub brush

About the Author

Melissa Lewis is a former elementary classroom teacher and media specialist. She has also written for various online publications. Lewis holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/liquidlibrary/Getty Images
  • Jupiterimages/liquidlibrary/Getty Images