How to Clean a Scorched Glass Baking Dish

Removing scorch marks from glass cookware can make the difference between getting years more use from your baking dishes and retiring them to the trash.
Abrasive scrubbers, such as steel wool, can ruin glass cookware.Abrasive scrubbers, such as steel wool, can ruin glass cookware.
Glass cookware can develop a carbon residue when food, oil or butter burns under high heat. This residue appears as a dark brown or black film. You can clean scorched glass baking and casserole dishes by immersing and scrubbing them in nonabrasive solutions, as coarse cleaning products cause scratches on glass.

Step 1

Set the glass cookware aside to cool. Exposing hot glass to a change in temperature such as cold water and hot or cold surfaces can cause it to shatter.

Step 2

Fill your sink with dish detergent and warm water. Soak the glass baking dish for at least one hour. Scrape stuck-on food off with an oven razor scraper. Scrub the baking dish with a nylon scrubbing pad to remove burnt food remnants and to eliminate scorch marks. Rinse the pan.

Step 3

Pour 1 quart of water into a bowl. Add 4 tablespoons of baking soda. Stir the mixture until a paste forms. Dip a nylon sponge in the paste. Rub the paste onto the scorched cookware in a circular motion. Allow the baking soda to rest on the glass cookware for 20 minutes. Scrub and rinse the paste off with the nylon pad.

Step 4

Pour oven cleaner on the burnt surfaces of the glass cookware, if discoloration still occurs. Place the cookware in a plastic garbage bag and tie the bag shut for 24 hours. Remove the cookware and wash it with soapy water and a soft sponge. The oven cleaner contains chemical degreasers that break down the carbon residue left on scorched glass.

Things You Will Need

  • Dish detergent
  • Water
  • Oven razor scraper
  • Nylon scrubbing pad
  • Baking soda

About the Author

Taylor DiVico is a professional songwriter, content writer, fiction novelist and poet with more than 15 years of experience. DiVico holds a B.A. in philosophy from the University of Rhode Island and an M.S. from Syracuse University.