How to Decorate on Bedroom Walls With Scarves

Decorating your bedroom walls with scarves offers you a simple way to add a color, pattern and texture to your decor.

Tapestry

Make sure your scarf has a pattern that complements your bedroom's decor.Make sure your scarf has a pattern that complements your bedroom's decor.
Scarves are as versatile as a decorating textile as they are in your wardrobe. The colorful silk or cotton squares or oblongs may be used in pieces based on traditional wall art while others employ more dimensional materials. If you don't have any scarves on hand, troll local thrift shops and estate sales to pick up materials for your project for pennies.

Step 1

Cut one or more craft dowels with a handsaw to match the upper edge of the scarf or scarves you plan to use. Dowel that are 1/2 inch around are lightweight enough to hang, but stiff enough to support a scarf.

Step 2

Press enough scarves on an ironing board with an iron at the appropriate heat level to make the number of tapestries you'd like to hang on your wall. Large scarves work best. Make sure that they're the right size for the dowels you've purchased. Use any kind of scarf that appeals to you, ranging from the cowboy's bandana to a long sarong. Look for colors and designs that go with the decorating motif you've chosen for your bedroom.

Step 3

Tack the scarf onto the dowel with the upholstery tacks. Place the tacks about an inch apart along the whole length of the scarf.

Step 4

Cut a length of ribbon with scissors. Measure it so each piece stretches from one end of the dowel to the other with about 3 extra inches. For example, if you've chosen a 36-inch dowel, cut the ribbon so that it's at least 41 inches.

Step 5

Attach the ribbon to the ends of the dowel with an upholstery tack. Do the same to the other side of the dowel. The ribbon creates a hanger for you to hang the scarf on the wall.

Dimensional Wall Plaques

Step 1

Lay 1-inch thick square or rectangular slabs of Styrofoam out on a work surface.

Step 2

Cover the Styrofoam block with the scarf. The scarf should extend over the sides of the block by at least 3 inches on all sides.

Step 3

Wrap one end of the scarf over the side of the Styrofoam block. Pin this side of the scarf down using straight pins. Tuck the corners of the fabric in and tack them down as well. This will look a little like the end of a wrapped present. The scarf should completely cover the slab. Repeat with as many scarves and slabs as you have available.

Step 4

Pound 1-inch nails into the wall; place two parallel to each other about 2 inches apart.

Step 5

Push the scarf-covered Styrofoam block onto the nail. There should be plenty of Styrofoam on the back of the wall hanging that's not covered with fabric. Push the nails into the Styrofoam in a spot that's not covered so that it hangs on your bedroom wall. Repeat for each plaque you made.

Shadowboxes

Step 1

Take shadowbox frames apart.

Step 2

Glue pieces of your scarves onto the back of the shadowboxes. This provides a visual backdrop that will look a little like contact paper on the back wall of the shadowbox.

Step 3

Cut up the scarves into pieces that will fit into the compartments of the shadowboxes and glue the pieces onto the back of the shadowboxes. This should cover the back of the shadowbox entirely.

Step 4

Fill the compartments with items such as buttons, skeleton keys, shells, old postcards or other small keepsakes.

Step 5

Replace the glass on the shadowboxes and hang up.

Things You Will Need

  • Craft dowels
  • Handsaw
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Upholstery tacks
  • Scarves
  • Tacks
  • Scissors
  • Styrofoam
  • Straight pins
  • Shadowbox kits
  • Glue
  • Decorative trinkets

About the Author

Buffy Naillon has worked in the media industry since 1999, contributing to Germany's "Der Spiegel" magazine and various websites. She received a bachelor's degree in German from Boise State University. Naillon also attended New York University and participated in the foreign exchange program at Germany's Saarland University. She is completing her master's degree in educational technology at Boise State.