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How to Repair Bea Staple Guns

A BEA Staple gun uses air pressure to push staples into materials. The pneumatic piston that propels the staples can cause a staple to get stuck in the loading chamber. You can repair a malfunctioning BEA staple gun by removing the stuck staple. No disassembly of the BEA is required, although you will need common tools most homes have on hand.


Step 1

Unplug the air compressor's power cord.  Grip with pliers the connector at the end of the compressor's air hose attached to the BEA staple gun.

Twist the pliers counterclockwise to loosen the connector.  Unscrew the connector with your fingers.

Remove the connector from the socket on the BEA and place it aside. 


Step 2

Turn the BEA upside down.  Press outward on the two tabs on the bottom of the BEA.

Pull the staple compartment lid off of the bottom. 


Step 3

Grip the edge of the staple bar farthest from the front with the jaws of a needle-nose pliers.  Pull the staple bar out of the compartment and place it aside.


Step 4

Grip an edge of the staple that is stuck inside the channel at the inside front end of the compartment.  Twist the pliers back and forth to dislodge the staple from the channel.

Pull the staple out and dispose of it. 


Step 5

Run the end of a toothpick inside the channel to remove any loose metal shavings that might be there.  Hold the BEA right-side up.

Blow out the channel from below with a burst of compressed air.  Turn the BEA upside down again.


Step 6

Insert the staple bar back into the compartment.  Push the end of the bar closest to the back forward.

Stop pushing the bar when resistance is felt.  Close the lid and press the tabs toward each other to lock the lid in place.


Step 7

Turn the BEA right-side up.  Screw the air hose connector back onto the socket.

Tighten the connector with the pliers.  Plug the compressor's power cord into the outlet when you want to use the BEA again.

Things You Will Need

  • Pliers
  • Needle-nose pliers
  • Toothpick
  • Compressed air

Warning

  • Wear protective goggles and gloves to prevent the chance of being harmed by a staple.

About the Author

Alice Godfrey is a marketing analyst with more than 15 years of experience in her field. She holds a Ph.D. in social and personality psychology. Past positions include market research analyst at various advertising agencies and corporations. Her articles on a wide variety of issues relating to entertainment have appeared in numerous trade publications.