How to Replace an Electric Plug

When an electrical plug becomes worn or damaged, it poses a risk of fire.

Instead of throwing the whole item away, you can simply replace the plug. Since there are several different types of plugs, it's important to use a similar plug as a replacement.

Cut off the old plug plus an additional inch of the cord. Remove the cardboard cover on the new plug so that you can pull the cord through the center of the new plug. Strip off 3 inches of outer insulation on the end of the cord, exposing the wires. Next, strip 1/2 inch off of the wire insulation.

Tie an underwriters knot close to the section of wire that you just striped. This helps to ensure that the wire won't come loose from tugging. When replacing a 240-volt plug, you can skip this step since there is a clamp that holds the wires inside the plug.

Make hooks on the end of the wire strands by twisting tightly with needle-nose pliers. Hook the wires to the screw shafts inside of the new plug. Be sure to attach the black wire to the brass colored screw. Tighten the screws. For 240-volt plugs, you have an extra wire. Attach the black and red wires to the brass-colored screw, and attach the green wire to the silver screw.

Make sure to tuck all the wires down inside the new plug. If there is a clamp inside the plug, make sure it is secure. Place the cardboard cover back on the plug.

Tip

  • If you are replacing a grounded plug, follow the directions for the non-grounded; however, make sure you attach the green wire to the grounding blade.