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How to Choose Wood Blinds

Wood blinds add warmth to a room, allow you to control light, and can also help insulate the room. Wood blinds are usually constructed from ramin wood or bass wood. Bass wood is the best choice as it is stronger and has a more distinctive grain. Ramin wood provides a more economical alternative, however. Your window or door type will help determine what style of wood blinds you choose, as will your taste in finish and control needs.

  1. Measure the width, height and depth of the window(s) and door(s) you want to cover.

  2. Use your measurements to determine what slat size you need. One-inch slats are best for shallow or small windows and doors where blind widths may get in the way of door handles. Two-inch slats are the most popular and look good on almost all windows. Slats 2.5 inches to 3 inches are great for picture windows or those looking out to fantastic views. These have large spaces between slats, allowing you to enjoy the view when tiled open.

  3. Decide what slat design you want -- curved or flat. Flat slats allow some light to seep through even when tiled shut whereas curved slats bend the light down and prevent light from getting through when tiled closed. If you want your room completely dark when the blinds are shut, opt for curved slats.

  4. Figure out what type of finish you want. Wood blinds come with a genuine wood finish, meaning there is no stain; a stained finish where the wood is made to look darker, usually to resemble cherry wood; a sandblasted finish which is designed to bring out the grain; and a painted finish.

  5. Choose your control type. Wood blinds come with traditional cord control, cordless versions, and motorized tilt. Cordless can be ideal for those with kids or pets or if you just don't want cords hanging down. Motorized options only control the tilt of the slat; they do not move them up or down.

Warning

  • If you choose a traditional cord control for your wood blinds, make sure to keep the cords out of reach of children and pets as they can become tangled in the cords.

About the Author

Jorina Fontelera has been writing about business since 2003, covering the printing and manufacturing sectors, as well as the global accounting and financial industries. She has contributed to "USA Today," "Milwaukee Business Journal" and several trade publications, also writing about parenting, animals, food and entertainment. Fontelera holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Marquette University.